Range
Bald Eagle breeds from northwestern Alaska and central Canada south to the southern United States and Baja California, but very locally distributed in interior North America. Winters from Alaska and southern Canada south along the coast and major river systems to at least the southern limits of the breeding range.

Status in British Columbia
Uncommon to fairly common resident along the coast of Vancouver Island, the Queen Charlotte Islands, and the adjacent mainland; seasonally and locally very common to abundant. Rare to uncommon summer visitant in the northern interior, and uncommon resident in the southern interior; local in winter in the vicinity of ice-free rivers and lakes. Widespread breeder.

Breeding
Bald Eagles breed primarily in coniferous forests—but also in deciduous and mixed woodlands—near seashores, lakes, large rivers, and marshes, and on islands. Large trees are important habitat components. Nests were usually massive, cup-shaped platforms with fairly flat tops, and were constructed of dead sticks, branches, and twigs. Some pieces were up to 9 cm in diamet Read More
Range
Bald Eagle breeds from northwestern Alaska and central Canada south to the southern United States and Baja California, but very locally distributed in interior North America. Winters from Alaska and southern Canada south along the coast and major river systems to at least the southern limits of the breeding range.

Status in British Columbia
Uncommon to fairly common resident along the coast of Vancouver Island, the Queen Charlotte Islands, and the adjacent mainland; seasonally and locally very common to abundant. Rare to uncommon summer visitant in the northern interior, and uncommon resident in the southern interior; local in winter in the vicinity of ice-free rivers and lakes. Widespread breeder.

Breeding
Bald Eagles breed primarily in coniferous forests—but also in deciduous and mixed woodlands—near seashores, lakes, large rivers, and marshes, and on islands. Large trees are important habitat components. Nests were usually massive, cup-shaped platforms with fairly flat tops, and were constructed of dead sticks, branches, and twigs. Some pieces were up to 9 cm in diameter. Nests were lined with grasses, mosses, strips of cedar bark, leaves, and pieces of fresh conifer boughs. Clutch size ranged from 1 to 3 eggs, with a majority having 2 eggs.

Remarks
Gerrard (1983) suggests that Alaska and British Columbia account for 48,000 (69%) of the 70,000 Bald Eagles estimated to occur in North America. Populations in western North America are generally stable. It has been suggested by many biologists, including ServUeen and English (1979), that there are regular migratory movements of Bald Eagles along the Pacific coast and this is supported by our data.

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Bird Song of Bald Eagle

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Sonogram

Sonogram of Bald Eagle Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Tape Number: M6.004(19a)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips
Length: not available
Location Description: Early morning
Location Name: Hatley Park, Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Pair of attentive birds in snag of tall tree, nest in another tree. Many song birds in the area - also Red-tailed Hawks. Calls very intermittent, not far enough from the highway. Lagoon near.
Date: --/06-07/--
Recorder: Grace Bell
Tape Number: M6.004(19a)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips
Length: not available
Location Description: Early morning
Location Name: Hatley Park, Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Pair of attentive birds in snag of tall tree, nest in another tree. Many song birds in the area - also Red-tailed Hawks. Calls very intermittent, not far enough from the highway. Lagoon near.
Date: --/06-07/--
Recorder: Grace Bell

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Range
Breeds from the northern limit of trees in North America south throughout North, Central, and South America.

Status in British Columbia
Uncommon resident throughout the province, except in the Queen Charlotte Islands, where it is casual. Widespread breeder.

Breeding
The Great Horned Owl breeds throughout the province except on the Queen Charlotte Islands, almost anywhere there are groups of small and large trees. It may be found in dense forests, open woodlands bordering lakes and marshes, and along fence rows. It also breeds in holes and crevices in cliffs, clay banks, and man-made structures. Most nests were situated in natural sites, including coniferous or deciduous woods and cliffs. Sizes for 35 clutches ranged from 1 to 4 eggs, with the majority having 2 eggs.

Range
Breeds from the northern limit of trees in North America south throughout North, Central, and South America.

Status in British Columbia
Uncommon resident throughout the province, except in the Queen Charlotte Islands, where it is casual. Widespread breeder.

Breeding
The Great Horned Owl breeds throughout the province except on the Queen Charlotte Islands, almost anywhere there are groups of small and large trees. It may be found in dense forests, open woodlands bordering lakes and marshes, and along fence rows. It also breeds in holes and crevices in cliffs, clay banks, and man-made structures. Most nests were situated in natural sites, including coniferous or deciduous woods and cliffs. Sizes for 35 clutches ranged from 1 to 4 eggs, with the majority having 2 eggs.


Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus)

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Bird Song of Bald Eagle

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Sonogram

Sonogram of Great Horned Owl Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Tape Number: M6.042(17b)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, using Brenell, 100ft. cazble NE 633 Microphone, 40 " Parabolic Reflector. 7" reel, subject 50 to 100 ft. away or more.
Length: not available
Location Description: 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Location Name: Island Rd. Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Same bird as previous cut. Could not monitor from Muicrophone and Reflector so was (?) to get properly centered. He seemed to come in low and near in the garden shrubbery type trees after a playback. Numerous pellets under a fir, collected for analysis. A few high shrieks are good, better take them out before changing tape.
Date: 1963/12/23&28
Recorder: Grace Bell
Tape Number: M6.042(17b)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, using Brenell, 100ft. cazble NE 633 Microphone, 40 " Parabolic Reflector. 7" reel, subject 50 to 100 ft. away or more.
Length: not available
Location Description: 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Location Name: Island Rd. Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Same bird as previous cut. Could not monitor from Muicrophone and Reflector so was (?) to get properly centered. He seemed to come in low and near in the garden shrubbery type trees after a playback. Numerous pellets under a fir, collected for analysis. A few high shrieks are good, better take them out before changing tape.
Date: 1963/12/23&28
Recorder: Grace Bell

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Become familiar with the appearance, song, ecology, and taxonomic groupings of Canadian birds of prey, with particular reference to British Columbia
  • Understand the importance of field notes in ecology, and be aware of typical information found in such notes

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