Range
Introduced and established in North America from southern Canada south to Washington, northern California, Utah, and Kansas, east to Virginia and New England. Scattered local populations elsewhere. Native to Asia.

Status in British Columbia
Introduced. Fairly common to common resident on southeastern Vancouver Island, the Fraser Lowlands, the Okanagan valley and the vicinities of Salmon Arm and Creston. Elsewhere, populations are local and the status is unknown.

Breeding
The Ring-necked Pheasant breeds in most habitats except dense woodlands, but prefers agricultural areas in shrubby, grass and grain fields. Other habitats include orchards, open deciduous woodlands, marshes, ditches, parks, golf courses and gardens in residential areas, rangeland, seismic road and powerline cuts, and bogs. Nests were small depressions in the ground and were formed of grasses, feathers, weed stalks, twigs, and rootlets. They were lined with grasses, leaves, feathers, weeds, and, in-frequently, dried mosses. Sizes for clutches ranged from 2 to 28 eggs, with a majority having 9 to 13 eggs.

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Range
Introduced and established in North America from southern Canada south to Washington, northern California, Utah, and Kansas, east to Virginia and New England. Scattered local populations elsewhere. Native to Asia.

Status in British Columbia
Introduced. Fairly common to common resident on southeastern Vancouver Island, the Fraser Lowlands, the Okanagan valley and the vicinities of Salmon Arm and Creston. Elsewhere, populations are local and the status is unknown.

Breeding
The Ring-necked Pheasant breeds in most habitats except dense woodlands, but prefers agricultural areas in shrubby, grass and grain fields. Other habitats include orchards, open deciduous woodlands, marshes, ditches, parks, golf courses and gardens in residential areas, rangeland, seismic road and powerline cuts, and bogs. Nests were small depressions in the ground and were formed of grasses, feathers, weed stalks, twigs, and rootlets. They were lined with grasses, leaves, feathers, weeds, and, in-frequently, dried mosses. Sizes for clutches ranged from 2 to 28 eggs, with a majority having 9 to 13 eggs.

Remarks
From 1882 to 1920, at least 500 Ring-necked Pheasants were released at a number of locations in coastal and interior British Columbia. Some birds were imported from England, but most came from China. From this stock, populations became established and spread throughout suitable habitat, although many additional introductions were made to bolster local populations.


Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Ring-necked Pheasant

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus)

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Ring-necked Pheasant Bird Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Sonogram

Sonogram of the Ring-necked Pheasant Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Tape Number: M5.171(07e)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, Nagra, 40" Parabolic Reflector
Length: 00:30
Location Description: 4:00-6:00 a.m.. Cold, dull. Wood and meadow
Location Name: West Saanich Rd., 2 miles past Beaver Lake Rd.
General Remarks: With Rick Davies who was doing a study for his Masters in Zoology. There were 3 particular birds he had been taping on Uvic (?). His recordings were good but he wanted to see if he could not amplify. He played his calls and hoped for play back results that I could then record but birds didn't respond. Robins and noises began around 6:00 and there was little success.
Date: 1969/04/08
Recorder: Grace Bell
Tape Number: M5.171(07e)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, Nagra, 40" Parabolic Reflector
Length: 00:30
Location Description: 4:00-6:00 a.m.. Cold, dull. Wood and meadow
Location Name: West Saanich Rd., 2 miles past Beaver Lake Rd.
General Remarks: With Rick Davies who was doing a study for his Masters in Zoology. There were 3 particular birds he had been taping on Uvic (?). His recordings were good but he wanted to see if he could not amplify. He played his calls and hoped for play back results that I could then record but birds didn't respond. Robins and noises began around 6:00 and there was little success.
Date: 1969/04/08
Recorder: Grace Bell

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Range
Resident from southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and western Nevada south to southern Baja California. Established through introductions in southern British Columbia, Washington, western Idaho, and Utah, as well as Chile, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany.

Status in British Columbia
Introduced. Uncommon to locally common resident on southern Vancouver Island and in the southern interior. Very rare in the Fraser Lowlands and Creston valleys.

Breeding
The California Quail frequents a variety of open habitats, including farmland (orchards, pastureland, rangeland, cultivated fields, hayfields), rural and urban residential gardens, city parks, and, to a lesser extent open ponderosa pine forests, deciduous bottomland, sagebrush flats, ravines, riparian woodland and shrubland. All nests were situated in slight depressions on the ground. Materials were principally grasses, occasionally with mixtures of leaves, twigs, rootlets, or needles. Clutch size ranged from 1 to 26 eggs with half having 10 to 15 eggs.

Remarks
California Quail were first i Read More
Range
Resident from southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and western Nevada south to southern Baja California. Established through introductions in southern British Columbia, Washington, western Idaho, and Utah, as well as Chile, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany.

Status in British Columbia
Introduced. Uncommon to locally common resident on southern Vancouver Island and in the southern interior. Very rare in the Fraser Lowlands and Creston valleys.

Breeding
The California Quail frequents a variety of open habitats, including farmland (orchards, pastureland, rangeland, cultivated fields, hayfields), rural and urban residential gardens, city parks, and, to a lesser extent open ponderosa pine forests, deciduous bottomland, sagebrush flats, ravines, riparian woodland and shrubland. All nests were situated in slight depressions on the ground. Materials were principally grasses, occasionally with mixtures of leaves, twigs, rootlets, or needles. Clutch size ranged from 1 to 26 eggs with half having 10 to 15 eggs.

Remarks
California Quail were first introduced to British Columbia near Victoria in the early 1860s. Introductions were later made to the Fraser River delta (1890), Nicola (1908), the Queen Charlotte Islands (1910), and South Pender Island (about 1910). In the Okanagan valley, quail were first introduced near Penticton in 1912. California Quail were also introduced near Grand Forks in April 1957, several times to the Creston-Lister area, and to the Vanderhoof area.

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

California Quail Bird Song

California Quail (Callipepla californica)

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


California Quail Bird Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Sonogram

Sonogram of California Quail Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Tape Number: M6.086(20d)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips
Length: 2:14
Location Description: 6:30 a.m., still, clear, low tide, sun and clouds, mild
Location Name: Loon Beach, Uplands; Victoria, BC
General Remarks: The thick bank of shrubbery, still green and showey is a splendid place for bird protection. There must have been 100 up along the beach by water line hidden by bush overhang. Some came out onto logs in groups of a few dozen. They preened, slept, ran openly on wet sand. Were apprehensive when I turned Nagra on, some flew over to join other members, but mostly lined up close file on a log (12). Various stages of maturity. Then a great cloud broke noisly into the air and disappeared.
Date: 1963/08/27
Recorder: Grace Bell
Tape Number: M6.086(20d)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips
Length: 2:14
Location Description: 6:30 a.m., still, clear, low tide, sun and clouds, mild
Location Name: Loon Beach, Uplands; Victoria, BC
General Remarks: The thick bank of shrubbery, still green and showey is a splendid place for bird protection. There must have been 100 up along the beach by water line hidden by bush overhang. Some came out onto logs in groups of a few dozen. They preened, slept, ran openly on wet sand. Were apprehensive when I turned Nagra on, some flew over to join other members, but mostly lined up close file on a log (12). Various stages of maturity. Then a great cloud broke noisly into the air and disappeared.
Date: 1963/08/27
Recorder: Grace Bell

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Become familiar with the appearance, song, ecology, and taxonomic groupings of Canadian fowl-like bird species, with particular reference to British Columbia
  • Understand the importance of field notes in ecology, and be aware of typical information found in such notes

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