Range
Breeds from Alaska eastward across most of northern Canada, except the high Arctic islands, along the Hudson Bay coast, and south through the Maritimes; also very locally on the British Columbia coast south to Vancouver. Winters from central California and South Carolina to southern South America.

Status in British Columbia
common to locally abundant migrant and summer visitant on the coast. Locally common to very common migrant in the interior; fairly common summer visitant in the Northern Mountains. Very rare in winter on the coast.

Breeding
Nest site selection varies with geographic location. On the Queen Charlotte Islands, most nests were situated within a line of semi-permanent drift logs deposited on sand dunes well above the normal summer high tide line. Beach nests were shallow scrapes in the sand, usually lined with hits of seaweed, grasses, white clam shells, or small i stones. In the northwest, nests were situated near water on the hare edges of lakes, on sparsely vegetated slopes, river bars, and manmade habitats such as gravelly road sides and clearings. In these habitat Read More
Range
Breeds from Alaska eastward across most of northern Canada, except the high Arctic islands, along the Hudson Bay coast, and south through the Maritimes; also very locally on the British Columbia coast south to Vancouver. Winters from central California and South Carolina to southern South America.

Status in British Columbia
common to locally abundant migrant and summer visitant on the coast. Locally common to very common migrant in the interior; fairly common summer visitant in the Northern Mountains. Very rare in winter on the coast.

Breeding
Nest site selection varies with geographic location. On the Queen Charlotte Islands, most nests were situated within a line of semi-permanent drift logs deposited on sand dunes well above the normal summer high tide line. Beach nests were shallow scrapes in the sand, usually lined with hits of seaweed, grasses, white clam shells, or small i stones. In the northwest, nests were situated near water on the hare edges of lakes, on sparsely vegetated slopes, river bars, and manmade habitats such as gravelly road sides and clearings. In these habitats, nests were usually next to an object such as a stone or Me plant, or in open ground on fresh earth, a clump of lichen, or a low hummock. Sizes of clutches ranged from 2 to 4 eggs with most having 4 eggs.

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Semipalmated Plover

Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus)

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Semipalmated Plover Bird Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Sonogram

Sonogram of Semipalmated Plover Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Tape Number: M6.087(03a)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, Microphone 100 ft. from recorder, 15-20 ft. from bird. The mike faced the bird from a piece of wood on the ground.
Length: not available
Location Description: Warm, slight breeze.
Location Name: Albert Head Lagoon, Victoria, BC
General Remarks: A lethargic, tired, single Semipalmated Plover slowly picked up something to eat in a puddle like pond near enough to be watched and recorded. After bathing and drinking he preened, slept, awoke, then called. While he bathed his bobbing seemed automatically increased, but the rhythms didn’t synchronize! He was much whiter below on the head after his bath.
Date: 1960/09/15
Recorder: Grace Bell
Tape Number: M6.087(03a)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, Microphone 100 ft. from recorder, 15-20 ft. from bird. The mike faced the bird from a piece of wood on the ground.
Length: not available
Location Description: Warm, slight breeze.
Location Name: Albert Head Lagoon, Victoria, BC
General Remarks: A lethargic, tired, single Semipalmated Plover slowly picked up something to eat in a puddle like pond near enough to be watched and recorded. After bathing and drinking he preened, slept, awoke, then called. While he bathed his bobbing seemed automatically increased, but the rhythms didn’t synchronize! He was much whiter below on the head after his bath.
Date: 1960/09/15
Recorder: Grace Bell

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Range
Breeds in southern Alaska and in Canada in an eastwest band from south-central British Columbia to Labrador. Winters mainly from the southern United States to South America; also on the Pacific coast north to the southern Strait of Georgia.

Status in British Columbia
Rare to locally very common migrant throughout most of the province. Rare summer visitant to the central-interior. Rare winter visitant in the Fraser Lowlands; fairly common along the southeast coast of Vancouver Island.

Breeding
The Greater Yellowlegs breeds in swampy, forested lands between 900 and 1,220 m elevation. Preferred habitats include open or sparsely treed, mixed forests with low and sparse undergrowth near sloughs, wet meadows, or bogs. Burned ridges and clearings within forests are also used. Nests are extremely difficult to find. Most nests are probably screened to some extent by vegetation or other debris. Sizes for 9 clutches ranged from 3 to 4 eggs.
Range
Breeds in southern Alaska and in Canada in an eastwest band from south-central British Columbia to Labrador. Winters mainly from the southern United States to South America; also on the Pacific coast north to the southern Strait of Georgia.

Status in British Columbia
Rare to locally very common migrant throughout most of the province. Rare summer visitant to the central-interior. Rare winter visitant in the Fraser Lowlands; fairly common along the southeast coast of Vancouver Island.

Breeding
The Greater Yellowlegs breeds in swampy, forested lands between 900 and 1,220 m elevation. Preferred habitats include open or sparsely treed, mixed forests with low and sparse undergrowth near sloughs, wet meadows, or bogs. Burned ridges and clearings within forests are also used. Nests are extremely difficult to find. Most nests are probably screened to some extent by vegetation or other debris. Sizes for 9 clutches ranged from 3 to 4 eggs.

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Greater Yellowlegs

Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca)

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Greater Yellowlegs Bird Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Sonogram

Sonogram of Greater Yellowlegs Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Tape Number: M6.058(17c)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, Nagra IIIB, Reflector, AKG Microphone
Length: 00:39
Location Description: 6:45 a.m, calm, still, sunny
Location Name: Cattle Point, Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Five in a cove between rocks left wet and muddy in the seaweed after a receding tide. I surprised them appearing over a rise and they flew over, calling. I left in the Kildeers - faint and at the end. Background: Gulls on nesting ground 1/4 mile off the Chain Islands, Kildeer
Date: 1964/08/17
Recorder: Grace Bell
Tape Number: M6.058(17c)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, Nagra IIIB, Reflector, AKG Microphone
Length: 00:39
Location Description: 6:45 a.m, calm, still, sunny
Location Name: Cattle Point, Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Five in a cove between rocks left wet and muddy in the seaweed after a receding tide. I surprised them appearing over a rise and they flew over, calling. I left in the Kildeers - faint and at the end. Background: Gulls on nesting ground 1/4 mile off the Chain Islands, Kildeer
Date: 1964/08/17
Recorder: Grace Bell

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Become familiar with the appearance, song, ecology, and taxonomic groupings of Canadian shore bird species, with particular reference to British Columbia
  • understand the importance of field notes in ecology, and be aware of typical information found in such notes

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