Range
Northwestern Crow is resident along the Pacific coast from south-coastal and southeastern Alaska south through British Columbia west of the Coast Mountains and Cascade Mountains, to northwestern Washington, including the Queen Charlotte Islands, Vancouver Island, and all other coastal islands.

Status in British Columbia
Fairly common to common summer resident along the coast. Throughout the rest of the year a common to very common resident in the Georgia Depression Ecoprovince, including the Sunshine Coast, Gulf Islands, and southeastern Vancouver Island; fairly common to common resident on Western Vancouver Island, the Southern and Northern Mainland Coast, and the Queen Charlotte Islands, in the Coast and Mountains Ecoprovince. Locally abundant to very abundant from late summer through early spring in the vicinity of nocturnal roosts, particularly in the Georgia Depression.

Breeding
The Northwestern Crow has a widespread breeding distribution along the British Columbia coast from southern Vancouver Island north to at least the Queen Charlotte Islands and Portland Inlet. Its eastw Read More

Range
Northwestern Crow is resident along the Pacific coast from south-coastal and southeastern Alaska south through British Columbia west of the Coast Mountains and Cascade Mountains, to northwestern Washington, including the Queen Charlotte Islands, Vancouver Island, and all other coastal islands.

Status in British Columbia
Fairly common to common summer resident along the coast. Throughout the rest of the year a common to very common resident in the Georgia Depression Ecoprovince, including the Sunshine Coast, Gulf Islands, and southeastern Vancouver Island; fairly common to common resident on Western Vancouver Island, the Southern and Northern Mainland Coast, and the Queen Charlotte Islands, in the Coast and Mountains Ecoprovince. Locally abundant to very abundant from late summer through early spring in the vicinity of nocturnal roosts, particularly in the Georgia Depression.

Breeding
The Northwestern Crow has a widespread breeding distribution along the British Columbia coast from southern Vancouver Island north to at least the Queen Charlotte Islands and Portland Inlet. Its eastward breeding distribution is imperfectly known but reaches at least to Chilliwack in the Georgia Depression and to Kitimat on the Northern Mainland Coast. Most birds nest within a few kilometres of the sea.
In selecting its nesting territory, the Northwestern Crow tends to avoid extensive areas of dense forest far removed from the ocean. Nesting habitat includes the hundreds of small rocky islets scattered along the coast. Many of these support nesting colonies of marine birds and feature a lush vegetation of fortes, bulbous plants, grasses, stunted crab apple, elderberry, salmonberry, snowberry, spirea, Pacific ninebark and even a few wind-wracked conifers. On these islands and islets, the Northwestern Crow frequently nests in low shrubs or on the ground.
The bulky nests were composed primarily of twigs, sticks, and small branches. Nests were lined mainly with bark strips, followed by grasses, moss, feathers, fine rootless, plant fibres and sometimes hair or human-made items such as paper, rope, fiberglass insulation and mattress filling. Sizes of clutches ranged from 1 to 6 eggs, with a majority having 4 or 5 eggs.

Remarks
The Northwestern Crow is a major predator and scavenger on coastal seabird colonies. On Mandarte Island, for example, it is a major predator upon the eggs of cormorants, the Glaucous-winged Gull and the Pigeon Guillemot.


Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Northwestern Crow

Northwestern Crow (Corvus caurinus)

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Northwestern Crow Bird Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Sonogram

Sonogram of Northwestern Crow Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Tape Number: M6.010(04b)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips,Originally recorded on Magnecorder, 40" Reflector
Length: 02:42
Location Description: Residential home with water in the vicinity. Early morning
Location Name: Gordon Head; Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Some song is distinctive and typical of the species, and shows where his song is different. This cut is very mixed up with dubbing from Magnecorder to Nagra and Brenell to Nagra
Date: 1962/02/18
Recorder: Grace Bell
Tape Number: M6.010(04b)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips,Originally recorded on Magnecorder, 40" Reflector
Length: 02:42
Location Description: Residential home with water in the vicinity. Early morning
Location Name: Gordon Head; Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Some song is distinctive and typical of the species, and shows where his song is different. This cut is very mixed up with dubbing from Magnecorder to Nagra and Brenell to Nagra
Date: 1962/02/18
Recorder: Grace Bell

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Range
Resident from southeastern Alaska, northwestern and central British Columbia, southwestern Alberta, western Montana, Wyoming, western Colorado, and New Mexico south to southern California, Arizona, southwestern Texas, and the Middle American highlands to Nicaragua.

Status in British Columbia
On the coast, uncommon to locally fairly common resident, including Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands.
In the interior, uncommon to locally fairly common resident across the Southern Interior and Southern Interior Mountains ecoprovinces; rare to fairly common in the Cariboo and Chilcotin areas of the Central Interior Ecoprovince; rare to uncommon in the Sub-Boreal Interior Ecoprovince; very rare in the Peace Lowland of the Boreal Plains Ecoprovince and in the Northern Boreal Mountains Ecoprovince. Absent from the Taiga Plains Ecoprovince. Locally, common to very common during irruptive movements in autumn and winter, across the southern portions of the province.

Breeding
The known nesting distribution of the Steller’s Jay is concentrated along the southern regions of th Read More
Range
Resident from southeastern Alaska, northwestern and central British Columbia, southwestern Alberta, western Montana, Wyoming, western Colorado, and New Mexico south to southern California, Arizona, southwestern Texas, and the Middle American highlands to Nicaragua.

Status in British Columbia
On the coast, uncommon to locally fairly common resident, including Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands.
In the interior, uncommon to locally fairly common resident across the Southern Interior and Southern Interior Mountains ecoprovinces; rare to fairly common in the Cariboo and Chilcotin areas of the Central Interior Ecoprovince; rare to uncommon in the Sub-Boreal Interior Ecoprovince; very rare in the Peace Lowland of the Boreal Plains Ecoprovince and in the Northern Boreal Mountains Ecoprovince. Absent from the Taiga Plains Ecoprovince. Locally, common to very common during irruptive movements in autumn and winter, across the southern portions of the province.

Breeding
The known nesting distribution of the Steller’s Jay is concentrated along the southern regions of the province from the International Boundary north to about latitude 51 °30’N, although it likely breeds throughout most of its range in the province. The Steller’s Jay reaches its highest numbers in summer in the Georgia Depression and on Western Vancouver Island.
Most nests were found in human influenced coniferous, mixed forest, or woodland habitat. Forest types included Interior Douglas-fir, Interior Western Hemlock/Redcedar, and Subalpine Fir/ White Spruce. The base of the nests consisted of coarse twigs or branches, with dry grass present in 35% of nests, and leaves, moss, string, plant stems, and other materials in lower frequency. Several nests had a mud cup; the most frequent lining material of the deep cup consisted of fine rootlets, sometimes with fine grass, moss, and paper. Sizes of 28 clutches ranged from 3 to 5 eggs with most having 4 eggs.

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Steller’s Jay

Steller’s Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri)

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Steller’s Jay Bird Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Sonogram

Sonogram Steller’s Jay Song

The Royal British Columbia Museum
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.


Tape Number: M6.045(16e)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, Nagra IIIB, AKG Microphone, 40" Parabolic Reflector, 75-125 ft. from subject
Length: 01:35
Location Description: 5:30-6:30 a.m., some snow, icy morning, dull, still. Garden Location Name: 742 St. Patrick St., Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Some nice "growls" in here (after 22 seconds), and a funny "old grandfather" one at end - slower and lower. Background: House Sparrow, Golden-crowned Sparrow, House Finch, Gull, children
Date: 1968/04/12
Recorder: Grace Bell
Tape Number: M6.045(16e)
Recording Remarks: 15 ips, Nagra IIIB, AKG Microphone, 40" Parabolic Reflector, 75-125 ft. from subject
Length: 01:35
Location Description: 5:30-6:30 a.m., some snow, icy morning, dull, still. Garden Location Name: 742 St. Patrick St., Victoria, BC
General Remarks: Some nice "growls" in here (after 22 seconds), and a funny "old grandfather" one at end - slower and lower. Background: House Sparrow, Golden-crowned Sparrow, House Finch, Gull, children
Date: 1968/04/12
Recorder: Grace Bell

Copyright © 2003, Royal British Columbia Museum Corporation (RBCM). All rights reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:  

  • Become familiar with the appearance, song, ecology, and taxonomic groupings of Canadian songbird species, with particular reference to British Columbia
  • Understand the importance of field notes in ecology, and be aware of typical information found in such notes

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