The Farmers' Bank of Rustico
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Doucet House

 

Architecture

The Doucet House in South Rustico is the only example of Acadian Vernacular home construction that remains fully intact on Prince Edward Island. This style of log home typically consisted of a one-and-a-half story house constructed with hewn, dovetailed logs to ensure a water tight seal at the seams. The 28'6" by 21'9" house has a steep 11/12 pitch roof, central stone fire place. The house is considered to be at the outer limits of this building style in terms of size. Most of these houses were considerably smaller than the Doucet House.

The term "Vernacular" simply means that the builders used materials that were all available locally. Every aspect of the Doucet House contains materials that were easily accessed in the Grand Père Point area where the house was originally constructed in 1772. The skilled, Acadian builders made great use of the materials that were readily available and relatively easily accessed in order to build sturdy buildings that have obviously stood the test of time. The skills and reputations of the Acadians as excellent builders was brought from France with the first Acadian settlers; the only significant change that took place in the buildings was due to the fact that the builders had to adapt to the new materials that were available.

The foundation of the building was constructed of Island sandstone that would have been the easiest and strongest material that was available to support the massive weight of a log home such as the Doucet House. The foundation consisted of rows of roughly worked stones. The spaces that were left between these stones were then filled with clay. The foundation was 4' high at its deepest point and the basement was then dug to a depth of approximately 5'6" leaving the stone foundation sitting on a clay base which was slanted inward to prevent movement.

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Aerial view of Doucet House beside Farmers' Bank

Aerial view of the Doucet House after restoration. 2006. Courtesy of Paul Blackquire.

View of Doucet House Homestead in 1960's

Painting of the Doucet House on its original property before restoration.

Doucet House interior view of original foundation

Interior view of the original foundation of Doucet House made of roughly worked Island sandstone.

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