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Bill of Rights

  1. That the half-breeds of the North-West Territories be given grants similar to those accorded to the half-breeds of the Manitoba Act of 1870.
  2. That patents be issued to all half-breed and white settlers who have fairly earned the right of possession to their farms; that the timber regulations be made more liberal; and the settler be treated as having rights in the country.
  3. That the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan be forthwith organised with legislatures of their own, so that the people may be no longer subject to the despotism of Mr. Dewdney; and, in the new provincial legislatures, that the Métis shall have a fair and reasonable share of representation.
  4. That the offices of trust throughout these provinces be given to residents of the country, as far as practicable, and that we denounce the appointment of disreputable outsiders and repudiate their authority.
  5. That this region be administered for the benefit of the actual settler, and not for the advantage of the alien speculator; and that all lawful customs and usages which obtain among the Métis be respected.
  6. That better provision be made for the Indians, the Parliamentary grant to be increased, and lands set apart as an endowment for the establishment of hospitals and schools for the use of whites, half-breeds, and Indians, at such places as the provincial legislatures may determine.
  7. That the Land Department of the Dominion Government be administered as far as practicable from Winnipeg, so that settlers may not be compelled, as heretofore, to go to Ottawa for the settlement of questions in dispute between them and the land commissioner.

References:

Mercer, Adam G. The Canadian North-West; Its History and Its Troubles, From the Early Days of the Fur Trade to the Era of the Railway and the Settler; with Incidents of Travel in the Region, and The Narrative of Three Insurrections. Toronto: Rose Publishing Co., 1885.

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