On Canadian Ground - Stories of Footwear in Early Canada See more of the Virtual Museum of Canada
ExhibitionMemorable Shoes

KAMIKS OF THE INUIT
MOCCASINS OF THE FIRST NATIONS
CHANGING STYLES - THE ROLE OF TRADE & VOYAGEURS
SHOES FOR A NEW LAND
SHOES MADE IN THE AGE OF THE CRAFTSMAN
CANADIAN FOOTWEAR IN THE AGE OF THE MACHINE
MEN'S SHOES
WOMEN'S SHOES
BELL SHOES
CHILDREN'S SHOES
SKATES
INDUSTRIALIZATION - MAKING SHOES WITH MACHINES
THE RETAIL STORE
BULLDOG TOE BUTTON BOOTS
ADVERTISING SHOES
THE PRESENT BEGINS HERE
C.N. Vroom, St. Stephen, New Brunswick, 1890 "The Coming Boot" James Leggat, Montréal, 1890
C.N. Vroom, St. Stephen, New Brunswick, 1890 "The Coming Boot" James Leggat, Montréal, 1890
J.D. King & Co., Toronto, 1890 W. A. Marsh & Co., Québec, 1890
J.D. King & Co., Toronto, 1890 W. A. Marsh & Co., Québec, 1890
Advertising Shoes

Shoe stores advertised their products through eye-catching window displays such as an animated figure or a giant shoe. Store owners usually kept the store windows as unobstructed as possible so that the patrons inside could use the daylight to see the shoes. Newspapers, magazines, and large signs helped the retailer inform potential customers what he had to sell, often in terms that are not unfamiliar today.

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