On Canadian Ground - Stories of Footwear in Early Canada See more of the Virtual Museum of Canada
ExhibitionMemorable Shoes

KAMIKS OF THE INUIT
MOCCASINS OF THE FIRST NATIONS
CHANGING STYLES - THE ROLE OF TRADE & VOYAGEURS
SHOES FOR A NEW LAND
SHOES MADE IN THE AGE OF THE CRAFTSMAN
CANADIAN FOOTWEAR IN THE AGE OF THE MACHINE
MEN'S SHOES
WOMEN'S SHOES
BELL SHOES
CHILDREN'S SHOES
SKATES
INDUSTRIALIZATION - MAKING SHOES WITH MACHINES
THE RETAIL STORE
BULLDOG TOE BUTTON BOOTS
ADVERTISING SHOES
THE PRESENT BEGINS HERE
Waterbury and Rising shoe store, 1909 (Isaac Erb)
Waterbury and Rising shoe store, 1909 (Isaac Erb)
The Present Begins Here

This exhibition ends at the beginning of the industrial age. Then as now, most people wore imported shoes, made by machines. Then as now, large shoe stores catered for people’s needs, using advertising to attract the customer’s attention and to sell their wares. Then as now, people had a wide variety of affordable shoes from which to choose. Think how different this approach is from the family-centred footwear traditions of the Inuit and First Nations.

Yet we all need shoes that can deal with the snow, the ice, the mud, and the dust - part of the way we live On Canadian Ground.
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