On Canadian Ground - Stories of Footwear in Early Canada See more of the Virtual Museum of Canada
ExhibitionMemorable Shoes

KAMIKS OF THE INUIT
MOCCASINS OF THE FIRST NATIONS
SNOWSHOES
THE FOOTED TROUSER
MOCCASINS
MAKING MOCCASINS
DECORATING MOCCASINS
EUROPEAN MATERIALS AND DESIGN FOR MOCCASINS
CHANGING STYLES - THE ROLE OF TRADE & VOYAGEURS
SHOES FOR A NEW LAND
SHOES MADE IN THE AGE OF THE CRAFTSMAN
CANADIAN FOOTWEAR IN THE AGE OF THE MACHINE
Scraping a moose hide, Rainbow Valley
Scraping a moose hide, Rainbow Valley 66k
Making Moccasins

Women made the moccasins and passed on their knowledge and skills from one generation to another. Moose hide would be be scraped and then smoked to soften, colour and waterproof it. Traditional tools were used to scrape and cut the skins effectively.

“I remember Grandma - when she was teaching me how to sew, she always said: ‘Now when you sew, you just do the best job you can, even if it’s in a place where it’s not going to be visible from the outside. If you sew something for somebody and it goes to another village, the people there are going to turn it inside out and look to see how well it’s done.”
Eliza Jones, Koykon from Nelson

Subarctic peoples hunted caribou and woodlands groups hunted deer and moose for food, skins and sinew. They used porcupine quills to sew designs on their garments, bags, and footwear.

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Beamer Flesher Scraper Knife Scraper Scraper
Beamer Flesher Scraper Knife Scraper Scraper
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