On Canadian Ground - Stories of Footwear in Early Canada See more of the Virtual Museum of Canada
ExhibitionMemorable Shoes

KAMIKS OF THE INUIT
MOCCASINS OF THE FIRST NATIONS
SNOWSHOES
THE FOOTED TROUSER
MOCCASINS
MAKING MOCCASINS
DECORATING MOCCASINS
EUROPEAN MATERIALS AND DESIGN FOR MOCCASINS
CHANGING STYLES - THE ROLE OF TRADE & VOYAGEURS
SHOES FOR A NEW LAND
SHOES MADE IN THE AGE OF THE CRAFTSMAN
CANADIAN FOOTWEAR IN THE AGE OF THE MACHINE
Chief Tanaghte by Cornelius Krieghoff, c. 1848
Chief Tanaghte by Cornelius Krieghoff, c. 1848 61k
Moccasins

Moccasins were the characteristic footwear of the First Nations. The flexibility of these soft-soled shoes enabled people to wear snowshoes, which allowed them to move quietly across the land, and to step into a birch bark canoe without damaging it. Decorations and cut-out patterns on moccasins sometimes indicated the wearer's clan or community.

The moccasin is a shoe in which the soft sole and the upper are one continuous piece of material. Most one-piece moccasins typically have a back and centre-front seam. Two-piece moccasins have an apron (vamp) inserted at the top of the foot. For both types, cuffs and collars can be either attached or part of the pattern.

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