Dreamers & The Land - Dreamers : Nááchįį / Oker

Dreamers & The Land | DREAMERS

 

Nááchįį / Oker


Born 1881 or 1878. Died in 1951.

Nááchįį means "Main Dreamer." The name Oker comes from our Dane-zaa pronunciation of his nickname, Sugar. Oker was the brother of Chief Succona. Oker had three wives over his lifetime and fathered eighteen children. He also raised Billy Makadahay, who became a remarkable singer. Two of his daughters married Aku, son of the Dreamer Azáde. His daughter, Annie, is the mother of Chief Gary Oker.

Oker's last wife, Alice Moccasin, married the drummer and songkeeper Albert Askoty after Oker passed away of old age in 1951 at Alááʔ S̱ato. His grave is in our cemetery there. Oker had settled at Alááʔ S̱ato, and "Oker Flats" is the area around his camp where we would gather for our Dreamers' Dances. Other Dreamers such as Charlie Yahey and Gaayęą would come to Oker flats to visit, share songs and stories, and dance with our people.

Billy Attachie recalls the death of Oker at Alááʔ S̱ato in 1951.

As one of the last of our Dreamers, Oker was instrumental in passing along our songs and traditions to our younger generations. Our Doig River Drummers continue to sing his songs at our Dreamers' Dances and community gatherings.


Stories
 
Billy Attachie, 2005

Billy Attachie, talking about the Dreamer Nááchįį/Oker, 2005.
video clip Click to Watch


Billy Attachie, 2005

Billy Attachie, talking about the Dreamer Nááchįį (Oker). Nętl'uk, 2005.

video clip Click to Watch


Songs
 
Albert Askoty singing a Nááchįį/Oker song, 1994.

Albert Askoty singing a song by the Dreamer Nááchįį/Oker, 1994.

audio clipClick to Listen


Doig River Drummers singing a Nááchįį/Oker song, 2001.

Doig River Drummers singing a song by the Dreamer Nááchįį/Oker, 2001

audio clip Click to Listen