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Canadian Immigration Overview

Canada admitted nearly 40,000 Hungarian refugees in 1956 and 60,000 Vietnamese boat people in 1979. In 1986, Canada was awarded the United Nations' Nansen Medal for its compassionate refugee policies. By the end of the 20th century, Canada became one of the largest immigrant and refugee receiving countries in the world, admitting thousands of refugees from Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo and other places. Following the attack on the World Trade Centre in New York on 11 September 2001, Bill C-11 was passed to tighten refugee admission procedures.    
Changes to the Immigration Act allow for the rejection of immigrants "belonging to any race deemed unsuitable to the climate or requirements of Canada."
Canada liberalizes immigration policies. Almost two million newcomers are admitted within a decade, including thousands of Jewish survivors.
"Points" system for immigration is implemented, based on language and job skill qualifications.
Canada is awarded the United Nations' Nansen Medal for its compassionate refugee policies.
Chinese Exclusion Act virtually stops Chinese immigration. It is repealed in 1947.
After years of lobbying by Canadian Jewish communities, 1,123 Jewish orphans enter Canada.
Canada admits nearly 40,000 Hungarian refugees following the Hungarian uprising.
Immigration and Refugee Board recognizes the special persecution women face as refugees.