Celebrating Gaspesia's Proud Military Tradition
Bay Chaleur Military Museum
New Richmond, Quebec

The Second World War

1

Great Coat
World War II, 1939-1945



Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

2

The Dieppe Raid

The Dieppe raid took place on August 19, 1942. The objective of the raid was to capture a German held port, destroy some predetermined targets, and then withdraw back to England.

The raid swiftly became a disaster. Nine hundred and seven Canadians lost their lives and another 1, 946 were captured and spent the rest of the war as prisoners.

The only positive results of the battle were that two Canadians were awarded the Victoria Cross for bravery and some valuable lessons were learned during the raid which probably saved lives during the D-Day invasion. For example, the Allies decided against any future attack directly on a port city. They also developed a number of specialized tanks for clearing mines on the beaches.

3

Stones takes from Dieppe Beach
World War II, 1939-1945
New Richmond, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

4

Steel Helmet
World War II, 1939-1945



Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

5

Canteen Water Bottle
World War II, 1939-1945
New Richmond, Quebec, Canada
TEXT ATTACHMENT


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

6

Anti-gas Respirator
World War II, 1939-1945
Grand Cascapedia, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

7

Ammunition Pouch
World War II, 1939-1945
New Richmond, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

8

D-Day


Fourteen thousand Canadians of the third division landed on Juno Beach on June 6, 1944. After one day of heavy fighting the Canadians had captured a number of small Normandy towns and had pushed deeper into France than any of the other allied forces. The battles for the beach head resulted in 340 Canadian deaths, with another 574 being wounded. Many local men were taken prisoner by the Germans during this assault.

The successful landings on D-day marked the beginning of the end of Nazi Germany.

9

Small Pack
World War II, 1939-1945
New Richmond, Quebec, Canada
TEXT ATTACHMENT


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

10

Putties
World War II, 1939-1945
New Richmond, Quebec, Canada
TEXT ATTACHMENT


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

11

Mess Tins
World War II, 1939-1945
New Richmond, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

12

Chesley Willett's Medals
World War II, 1939-1945
Grand Cascapedia, Quebec, Canada
TEXT ATTACHMENT


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

13

On the Home Front....


A Hudson Bomber in New Richmond

This Hudson Bomber which used extensively on coastal patrols brought the war close to home when it made a forced landing in what is now Chaleurs Park in New Richmond, on January 19, 1944 at 6:30p.m. It came to rest in a hay field behind the Montgomery farm. A ski–equipped Norseman ferried in the repair crew and the local militia kept a 24 hour guard over the bomber during it's "visit." Following repairs over a ten-day period, the field was plowed, the Hudson took off, and New Richmond life returned to normal.

14

Hudson Bomber in New Richmond
19 January 1944
New Richmond, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

15

War Turned to Art


Hilda Campbell, wife of Russel Campbell, made this quilt during the war years. The quilt documents all of the key events of World War II (and in particular records the military career of her son Charlie, including his 1, 325 day internment in a Japanese prisoner of war camp).

16

Quilt
World War II, 1939-1945
Grand Cascapedia, Quebec, Canada
TEXT ATTACHMENT


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

17

Hazel Campbell holding Quilt
20th Century, Circa 1990's
Grand Cascapedia, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

18

War Rationing . . .


As in the First World War, food shortages and rationing became a part of the reality of life on the home front. This new generation met the culinary challenges posed by strict rationing and developed new recipes. The following recipe was culled from a Sunbeam advertisement in the 1942 May issue of Good Housekeeping Magazine. This advertisement is for the new Sunbeam Mixmaster and a patriotic Sunbeam recipe is attached: "Mixmaster saves my time and energy for Red Cross work," the smiling woman in the ad declares.

19

Sunbeam Victory Cake (No Sugar)

- ½ c. shortening
- 2 tsp. grated orange rind
- 1 c. white corn syrup
- 2 1/4 c. sifted cake flour
- 2 3/4 tsp. baking powder
- 1/4 tep. salt
- 2 eggs unbeaten
- ½ c. milk
- 1 ½ tsp. vanilla extract

Cream shortening and rind No. 8 speed 1 minute. Add 1/4 sifted dry ingredients gradually on No. 8. add eggs one at a time beating 1 min. after each. Scrape. Use No. 1 speed and add remaining flour micture in thirds alternately with milk and vanilla. Scrape. Bake in 2 greased 8" layer pans in moderate over of 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 min.


Icing:

- 1/8 tsp. salt
- 1 egg
- ½ c. light corn syrup
- 1/4 tsp. lemon flavoring
- 1/4 tsp. almond flavoring

20

Rationing Poster
World War II, 1939-1945



Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

21

Nazi Spy in New Carlisle

On the 9th of November, 1941 a German U-Boat submarine (U-518) entered the Bay of Chaleur on a mission to launch a spy named Werner von Janowski off the coast of New Carlisle. Lt. Werner von Janowski's mission was to land on the Gaspe and make his way to Montreal via the railways. He was supposed to operate under the guise of a radio salesman working for the North Electric Company based in Toronto under the alias of William Branton.

At 12:30am Lt. Werner von Janowski left the U-518 submarine. He spent the remainder of the night on the beach undercover of the cliffs and by 8:30am he was making his way towards New Carlisle. James E. Coull, a CNR Conductor, picked up him and drove him into town. He checked into the Carlisle Hotel with the intention of taking a bath and readying himself for the train that evening. Earle J. Annett Jr. was manning the reception desk and his suspicions were aroused by this stranger: Werner von Janowski claimed to have arrived that morning by bus but the earliest bus into town would only arrive at noon, he paid with money which was out of date, and he left European cigar wrappings and matches behind. Earle Annett Jr. alerted the authorities and that evening the train was boarded in Bonaventure so that Janowski's bags could be searched, he was arrested immediately following the search which turned up German radio transmitters.

An extensive search of Chaleur Bay was launched for the German U-Boat by the HMCS Burlington and Red Deer assisted by RCAF aircrafts. The U-518 submarine was not found. In the following 18 months Lt. Werner von Janowski turned double agent and worked with the RCMP in Montreal sending selected information to the Hamburg in Germany. After this period he was turned over the British Intelligence in England.

22

RCMP Mug Shot of Janowski
World War II, 1939-1945
New Carlisle, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Dean Beebe (Cargo of Lies: The True Story of a Nazi Double Agent in Canada, published 1996 by the Toronto University Press)

23

Janowski's Naval Uniform
World War II, 1939-1945
New Carlisle, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Dean Beebe (Cargo of Lies: The True Story of a Nazi Double Agent in Canada, published 1996 by the Toronto University Press)

24

Werner von Janowski's Pre-War Years

Werner von Janowski emigrated to Canada and worked as a day labourer near London, Ontario in 1930. He claimed that his father served as a colonel in the German army, 78th Infantry Battalion during the First World War. For the most part he was liked and accepted in the small rural community. In 1932, he married a woman from Toronto, although their marriage fell apart by 1938 when he left to travel northern Ontario. How and when he returned to Germany to enlist in their navy and offer his services as a spy in Canada is unknown.

25

The Carlisle Hotel
World War II, 1939-1945
New Carlisle, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Dean Beebe (Cargo of Lies: The True Story of a Nazi Double Agent in Canada, published 1996 by the Toronto University Press)

26

Cover of Belgian Matchbox found on Janowski
World War II, 1939-1945
New Carlisle, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Dean Beebe (Cargo of Lies: The True Story of a Nazi Double Agent in Canada, published 1996 by the Toronto University Press)

27

A War Wedding . . .

This wedding dress was made from the material of a silk parachute. The dress was worn by Lyla Stimson on the occasion of her marriage to Kenneth Beattie. Kenneth Beattie served in Hong Kong with the Royal Rifles, and was imprisoned in a Japanese internment camp near Tokyo for almost four years. This parachute was dropped from an American plane to deliver relief supplies to soldiers on the boats returning home from the POW camps. Kenneth Beattie brought the parachute home and on September 7, 1946, Lyla wore it as a wedding dress when they married. The decision to use the parachute was sentimental, practical, and resourceful. Not only did the dress symbolize hope and liberation, but it would also have been extremely hard to come by silk at this time – war rationing, shortages, and price inflation would probably have made it nearly impossible to be married in an elaborate wedding gown.

28

Lyla Stimson Wedding Dress
7 September 1946
Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada
TEXT ATTACHMENT


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

29

Kenneth Beattie and Lyla Stimson's Wedding Photo
7 September 1946
Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum

30

Lyla Stimson Beattie and her Wedding Dress
20th Century, Circa 1990's
Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada


Credits:
Bay Chaleur Military Museum
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