Wallace and Area Museum
Wallace, Nova Scotia

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Acadian Removal at Remsheg, August 15, 1755

 
Tuttle Creek Dyke, well over 2 metres above high water, showing interior wall and drainage ditch
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Historic Marshland of Remsheg Bay
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The Dykes of Remsheg Bay
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Mural depicting the French/English conflict during the 17 th and 18th Centuries
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Rich marsh land, once protected by an Acadian dyke
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The Acadian Story
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Map of Nova Scotia in 1755, showing Acadian villages including Beaubasin, Remsheg and Tatamagouche
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Natural marsh grass, rich from centuries of decaying vegetation
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Mural of Acadian Settlement in Nova Scotia, by Barbara Clark
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The Acadian Settlement
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Mural by Barbara Clark showing Acadian farm life of 1700 - farming and building a dyke using oxen
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Acadian Settlement in Remsheg
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Image of Fort Lawrence, present day Amherst, in 1755
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1750 map of Nova Scotia, clearly showing the Chignecto to Cobiquid road (Amherst-Truro)
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The trail from Cobiquid (Truro) to Tatamagouche, rough in places, followed the Chigonois River
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British soldier re-enactors from the Acadian Deportation period
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Lt. Governor of Nova Scotia, Charles Lawrence; The Deploration took place under his command
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Re-enactment soldiers of the Deportation period
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