M u s e u m  C r e a t e d  L e s s o n

The Geology of Gold

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Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Physical Properties of Gold
1. Read more about the Mohs scale and gather a selection of minerals that look different from each other. Try to scratch each mineral using each of the other rocks and record your findings.
a. Can you use the Mohs scale to help you identify them?
b. Can you create your own hardness scale?
Gold Specimen
Gold specimen from Nova Scotia containing 17.7 troy ounces.
Gold specimen of unknown Nova Scotian locality, containing 17.7 troy ounces of gold.

Photography by Roger Lloyd. Nova Scotia Museum.


Nova Scotia Museum, 982GE0001.001 .

© 2013, Nova Scotia Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold
Weighing and Evaluating Gold
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold
Pyrite
Detail photograph of a pyrite specimen.
Close-up of a pyrite specimen from Beaverbank, Nova Scotia. Pyrite is shiny and yellow and people so often confuse it for gold it is known as “fool’s gold”. Pyrite is brassy yellow and often forms in cubes.

Photography by Roger Lloyd. Nova Scotia Museum.




© 2013, Fred Walsh. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold
Pyrite or Fool's Gold
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold
Golden Crossword
2. Create a crossword puzzle for your classmates using at least 12 words and clues from this section on The Geology of Gold.
The Geology of Gold
What is gold, how did it get to Nova Scotia and what are the two types of gold deposits found in Nova Scotia.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Model Anticlines and Synclines
3. Using layers of folded cloth, clay, or paper, create and label a model of anticlines and synclines.
Shaping the Landscape
Photograph showing anticline and syncline folds in the rocks along the shoreline of Nova Scotia.
Photograph of folded sedimentary rocks forming well developed anticlines and synclines found along the Minas Basin shore. When continents or large land masses collide, the rock layers of the Earth’s crust are pushed up into mountains or folded and compressed into hills and valleys. These folds are called anticlines and synclines.

G. Prime, Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources




© 2013, Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold
Anticlines and Synclines
Simplified illustration of anticline and syncline folds.
Folds that look like happy faces have the youngest rocks at the top and are called synclines. Folds that look like sad faces and have the oldest rocks at its core are called anticlines.

Art Gallery of Nova Scotia




© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold
Rock Layers
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold
Plate Tectonics
4. Research plate tectonics, and learn about the direction in which the various plates are moving. Find an image of what the world looked like two million years ago and compare it to the present. Draw a map of the way you think the world might look in another 3 million years. Are there new continents? Oceans? Mountain ranges? What would you name them?
Continental Collisions; The Geology of Nova Scotia
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold
290 Million Years Ago
Illustration of the North American continent 290 million years ago.
All of the continents on Earth had collided and formed one giant supercontinent called Pangaea. Vast coal swamps formed on the equator, including over Nova Scotia.

Ron Blakey and Colorado Plateau Geosystems Inc.




© 2013, Ron Blakey and Colorado Plateau Geosystems Inc.. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold
The Meguma Terrane
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Learning Object: The Geology of Gold

Learning Objectives

1. Investigate rocks and minerals and record questions and observations.
(Science, Grade 7)

2. Classify rocks and minerals by creating a chart or diagram that illustrates the classification scheme.
(Science, Grade 7)

3. Describe natural phenomena that cause rapid and significant changes.
(Science, Grade 7)

4. Demonstrate a sensitivity towards the natural and built environment through their art work.
(Visual Arts, Grades 7-12)