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Make Your Own Geology Map

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New Brunswick Museum, Saint John, New Brunswick

Overview
The geologic history of New Brunswick has shaped our landscapes, communities and economy. The province as we know it was formed over the last billion years forged by moving continents, changing climates and complex geologic processes. Experience a journey through geologic time and discover how the magnificent rocks beneath us influence our lives.
Make Your Own Geology Map
Use information to identify areas across the province by the age and type of bedrock.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Lesson Plan: Make Your Own Geology Map
Use information to identify areas across the province by the age and type of bedrock.
View the Learning Object

Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Generalized Geology Map of New Brunswick
Geology and topographical maps of New Brunswick illustrating rock formations and rock types
There is a lot to see on a map of New Brunswick geology. Over the last billion years fragments of continents have collided with the edge of ancient North America creating a complex geologic landscape. Ancient oceans, volcanic islands, mountains, rivers, swamps and glaciers have all left their geological imprint. A satellite image of New Brunswick clearly shows the underlying geological structure.

New Brunswick Museum




© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Geologic Time
Colour image illustrating geologic time with colour bands
The geologic time scale is a tool used to understand events that occurred during Earth history and the relationships between them. It has developed over more than a century as a system of names that help geologists relate the formation of rocks to time, and it organizes Earth’s geologic history based largely on events in the evolution of the planet and life.

New Brunswick Museum




© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Stromatolite: Archaeozoon acadiense
Colour image of gray rock with light gray circles
Stromatolite: Archaeozoon acadiense Matthew, Precambrian, Green Head, Saint John, New Brunswick, Collector: W. Murdoch, 1890. Stromatolite collected by William Murdoch. The structures built by successive mats of cyanobacteria and layers of sediment are easily seen. These stromatolites were built as ‘cabbage-shaped’ mounds in the shallow ocean.

Collector: W. Murdoch, 1890

Image width 124 cm
NBMG 3200

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Trilobite: Solenopleura acadica Whiteaves
Colour image of fossilized animal with hard shell stripes
Trilobite: Solenopleura acadica Whiteaves, Cambrian, Porter Brook, New Brunswick, Collector: G.F. Matthew, c. 1880. Trilobites were part of an ‘Explosion of Life’ in the Middle Cambrian Period. During this time most of the major groups of animals that now exist first appeared.

Collector: G.F. Matthew

Trilobite length 2.5 cm
NBMG 6041

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Folded Ore Zone: pyrite, galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite
Colour image of gray rock with semi-circular bands of lighter gray
Folded Ore Zone: pyrite, galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite, Ordovician, Brunswick Mines, New Brunswick, Collector: D. Bachinski. Typical "ore" from Brunswick No. 12 includes layers of pyrite and galena-sphalerite with small amounts of chalcopyrite.

Collector: D. Bachinski

Slab length 66 cm
NBME 1185

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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Brachiopod: Ancillotoechia Havlicek
Colour image of rock with brown fossilized shell
Brachiopod: Ancillotoechia Havlicek, Silurian, Central Greenwich, New Brunswick, Collector: R.A. Porter, c. 1970. Brachiopod fossils can be common in the Silurian rocks and have a fossil record back to the Cambrian Period. Brachiopods still exist today although most people are unfamiliar with them. They resemble clams in having two shells or valves that surround the body.

Collector: R.A. Porter

Specimen width 1.5 cm
NBMG 9081

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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Fish: Protodus jexi Woodward
Colour image of fossilized fish tooth
Fish: Protodus jexi Woodward, Devonian, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Collector: R.F. Miller, 2001. The shark known as Protodus jexi is known only from fossil teeth. The tooth shape is triangular, with a shallow groove down the side.

Collector: R.F. Miller

Image width 7 mm
NBMG 11983

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Albertite
Colour image of black rock with high level of sheen
Albertite, Lower Carboniferous, Albert Mines, New Brunswick, Collector: unknown.

Collector: Unknown

Specimen width 14 cm
NBME 1133

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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Plant: Eusphenopteris (Gothan) Simson-Scharold
Colour image of fossilized horizontal fern
Plant: Eusphenopteris (Gothan) Simson-Scharold, Upper Carboniferous, Clifton, New Brunswick, Collector: R.F. Miller and J. McGovern, 1997. The Clifton Formation has produced a rich assemblage of plants typical of the Upper Carboniferous Period.

Collectors: J. McGovern and R.F. Miller

Image width 5.5 cm
NBMG 10254

© 2012, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
View of the Honeycomb Point Formation, Honeycomb Point, St. Martins, New Brunswick
Colour photograph of red rock with vertical striping
photograph: View of the Honeycomb Point Formation, Honeycomb Point, St. Martins, New Brunswick, 2005. The Triassic age Honeycomb Point Formation is alluvial fan sequence composed of two rock types, conglomerate sandstone that coarsens upward to pebbly sandstone.

New Brunswick Museum




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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Plant: Araucarioxylon
Colour image of fossilized plant
Plant: Araucarioxylon, Cretaceous, Vinegar Hill, New Brunswick, Collector: Atlantic Silica Inc. Araucarioxylon, related to the modern monkey-puzzle tree, is New Brunswick’s only Cretaceous age macrofossil. Microfossil spores have been found here as well. The sand and gravel may still yield new fossil discoveries.

Collector: Atlantic Silica Inc.

Specimen width 28 cm
NBMG 14481

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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
American mastodon: Mammut americanum (Kerr)
Colour image of skeletal head and tusks
American mastodon: Mammut americanum (Kerr), Neogene, Hillsborough, New Brunswick, Collector: C. Osman, 1936. Mastodons once roamed the boreal forests of North America. The last of their kind became extinct about 10,000 years ago. Only a few mastodon fossils have been found in the Maritimes. In 1936 the ‘Hillsborough Mastodon’ was found in eastern New Brunswick. This animal likely lived more than 75,000 years ago during the last interglacial, the time between ice ages.

Collector: C. Osman

Reconstruction


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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks
Sea Caves at St. Martins
Dr. Randall Miller Research Curator, Geology and Palaeontology New Brunswick Museum
New Brunswick Museum
© 2013, New Brunswick Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Magnificent Rocks

Learning Objectives

Curriculum Outcomes:

1. Understand the origin and diversity of rocks.
2. Identify and explain the origin of selected local landforms.