M u s e u m  C r e a t e d  L e s s o n

Gold & Art: Jewellery and More

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Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Tombs and Time Capsules
Your job is to choose information for future generations that describes your world and what is most valuable in it. The tombs of pharaohs served this purpose in ancient Egypt; time capsules are often used in the modern world. A space age example of this kind of information selection was demonstrated by the Voyager I space probe. It carried a golden record of Earth sounds, as well as other information—you can read about it at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyager_Golden_Record

1. What would you bury in a tomb that would most effectively give them a picture of your world?
a. Decide what aspects are most important to convey: music, literature, sports, technology, industry, architecture, entertainment, fashion . . .
b. Choose the means that you will use to store these choices: photographic images, writing, memory stick, CD . . .
c. Explain your reasoning in choosing these items.
Uncovering Thracian Gold
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Egyptian Gold
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Hallmarks
2. You are a jewellery maker and want to identify your work. Create your own hallmarks, identifying yourself, your location, etc. referring to the hallmark information in this category. Make a die that allows you to print your hallmarks, using the material of
your choice, e.g. Styrofoam, wood, foam.
Introduction
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Cracking The Code—Marks that Reveal Identity
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Local Inspirations
3. Think about the area that you live in. What are the images that would most represent your area in a piece of jewellery? Think of possibilities in the natural world, industrial world, or specific to the culture of your community.
a. Choose five images that you could incorporate into pieces of
jewellery. Draw or photograph these images.
b. Design one piece of jewellery, incorporating as many of these images as you wish.
Julius Cornelius & the Mayflower
Photograph of a gold cross-shaped pendant with mayflowers twining around it.
Cross pendant made by Julius Cornelius. Gold mayflower motif, with pearls from Oyster Pond, NS. It’s said that Cornelius was particularly fond of mayflowers, Nova Scotia’s provincial flower.

Julius Cornelius


NSM History Collection: 60.20.4c

© 2013, Nova Scotia Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
The Mayflower in Nova Scotia and in Jewellery
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Earrings made by Julius Cornelius
14K gold flower earring with garnet centre, made by Julius Cornelius.
Julius Cornelius modeled oak leaves, acorns, and thistles. He portrayed horses—even a miner with a pick lifted over his shoulder. He made rings, watch-chains, brooches, lockets, bracelets, sugar tongs, and tableware. Cornelius also created the hair work jewellery that was popular at the time—a lock of hair in a brooch, visible through glass.

Julius Cornelius
14K gold, garnet flower, gold bud

NSM History Collection: 72.43.2a,b

© 2013, Nova Scotia Museum. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia
Contemporary Jewellers
4. Research a jeweller in your area. Choose a method (research paper, video, graphic book, etc.) to demonstrate:
a. their training
b. the materials they use/why they choose them
c. the processes they use
d. the themes or images specific to their jewellery
Looking at Modern-Day Jewellers
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Dian Day, Susan Sellers, Rita Wilson, Emily Seaboyer
© 2013, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All Rights Reserved.
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Learning Object Collection: Gold in Nova Scotia

Learning Objectives

1. Create and/or present collaboratively and independently expressive products in the arts for a range of audiences and purposes.
(Visual Arts, Grades 7-12)

2. Examine the relationships among arts, societies, and environments.
(Visual Arts, Grades 7-12)

3. Communicate information and ideas effectively and clearly, responding personally and critically.
(English Language Arts, Grades 7-12)