St. Vincent Street

St. Vincent Street building housing the Laboratory, from 1924 to 1968.

Musée de la civilisation
1924 - 1968
© Musée de la civilisation


1868
Creation of the first science laboratory dedicated to the fight against crime, the "Institut de médecine légale de Paris"(Paris Institute for Forensic Science).

1878
Dr. William Hodgeson Ellis testifies at a rape murder case explaining the significance of the number, size and position of bloodstains left on the clothes of an accused (ie. blood stain pattern analysis).

1882
Alphonse Bertillon, a French criminologist, who is known as the father of criminal identification, started using an anthropometric system, combined with photographic shots, to identify criminals. His system entailed taking a photograph of an individual looking directly at the camera followed by a second photograph of their profile. The subject’s height would then be measured as well as the lenght of one index finger, one arm and one foot.

1890
Alphonse Bertillon discovers that each individual fingerprint has unique characteristics. Fingerprinting quickly gains reco Read More
1868
Creation of the first science laboratory dedicated to the fight against crime, the "Institut de médecine légale de Paris"(Paris Institute for Forensic Science).

1878
Dr. William Hodgeson Ellis testifies at a rape murder case explaining the significance of the number, size and position of bloodstains left on the clothes of an accused (ie. blood stain pattern analysis).

1882
Alphonse Bertillon, a French criminologist, who is known as the father of criminal identification, started using an anthropometric system, combined with photographic shots, to identify criminals. His system entailed taking a photograph of an individual looking directly at the camera followed by a second photograph of their profile. The subject’s height would then be measured as well as the lenght of one index finger, one arm and one foot.

1890
Alphonse Bertillon discovers that each individual fingerprint has unique characteristics. Fingerprinting quickly gains recognition as way of identifying an individual.

1908
Order in Council of Canada sanctions use of fingerprints as a means of identification under the Identification of Criminals Act (1898).

1910
Creation of the world’s second forensic science laboratory in Lyon, France, headed by Edmond Locard.

1911
First set of fingerprints identified by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Fingerprint Bureau headed by Edward Foster (1863-1956), the "Father of Canadian Fingerprinting".

1913-14
Sir Lomer Gouin, Attorney General and Premier of Quebec, decides to create the first forensic lab in North America.

© 1998, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Develop enthusiasm and continuing interest in the study of science
  • Identify and appreciate the way history and culture shape a society’s science and technology
  • Describe scientific and technological developments, past and present and appreciate their impact on individuals and societies

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