The Lookout, Mount Royal Park

Left:The Lookout, Mount Royal Park, Montreal, QC. 1916

Right:Mount Royal Park. Belvedere lookout. Montreal, QC. After Notman (View-16204) Taken September 13th 2000 at 5:10 p.m.

Photographers: Left: William Notman, Right: Andrzej Maciejewski

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.


Date/Time: September 13, 2000, 5:10 p.m.

Then and now, this spot offers a remarkable view of Montreal. A careful study of the shadows on several visits gave an accurate idea of the month and time, while the railing provided a good reference point. I could not use the buildings in the distance, as they were unfocused in Notman's photograph. There must be an incredible number of photographs taken everyday from this vantage point. In my shot I managed to capture three other people taking snapshots. What I like the most in this set of photographs is the opportunity to compare the clothing that people wear. The change is incredible.
Date/Time: September 13, 2000, 5:10 p.m.

Then and now, this spot offers a remarkable view of Montreal. A careful study of the shadows on several visits gave an accurate idea of the month and time, while the railing provided a good reference point. I could not use the buildings in the distance, as they were unfocused in Notman's photograph. There must be an incredible number of photographs taken everyday from this vantage point. In my shot I managed to capture three other people taking snapshots. What I like the most in this set of photographs is the opportunity to compare the clothing that people wear. The change is incredible.

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.

Map

This Map of Montreal depicts the location where the photographs by Notman and Maciejewski were taken.

McCord Museum of Canadian History

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.


Sunday. For thousands of Montrealers, it was the only day of rest after a six-day work week. The day for mass and religious services. The day for family walks and outings with friends. In their Sunday best, in their finery, Montrealers wanted to see and, especially, be seen.

A big city like Montreal provided many places where families and young people could stroll and relax. Every neighbourhood had its squares and public gardens. But there were also the big municipal parks: Mount Royal, Lafontaine Park and, of course, Ste. Helen's Island. Private gardens and parks also had a great appeal. In Sohmer Park, Montrealers could walk on the terrace or sit down in the big concert hall to listen to concerts of popular music or watch vaudeville shows. Inspired by the American amusement parks, such as Luna Park and Coney Island, Dominion Park was enjoyed by the young and the not-so-young who were looking for excitement on its dozens of rides and attractions.
Sunday. For thousands of Montrealers, it was the only day of rest after a six-day work week. The day for mass and religious services. The day for family walks and outings with friends. In their Sunday best, in their finery, Montrealers wanted to see and, especially, be seen.

A big city like Montreal provided many places where families and young people could stroll and relax. Every neighbourhood had its squares and public gardens. But there were also the big municipal parks: Mount Royal, Lafontaine Park and, of course, Ste. Helen's Island. Private gardens and parks also had a great appeal. In Sohmer Park, Montrealers could walk on the terrace or sit down in the big concert hall to listen to concerts of popular music or watch vaudeville shows. Inspired by the American amusement parks, such as Luna Park and Coney Island, Dominion Park was enjoyed by the young and the not-so-young who were looking for excitement on its dozens of rides and attractions.
Printed Documents
  • Bellman, David (ed.). 1977. Mont-Royal : Montréal / Mount Royal : Montreal. Montreal : Musée McCord.
  • Dagenais, Michèle. 2000. « Entre tradition et modernité : Espaces et temps de loisirs à Montréal et à Toronto au XXe siècle ». Canadian Historical Review, vol. 82, no 2 (June), p. 308-330.
  • Lamonde, Yvan, et Raymond Montpetit. 1986. Le Parc Sohmer de Montréal, 1889-1919 : Un lieu populaire de culture urbaine. Québec: Institut québécois de recherche sur la culture.
  • Laplante, Jean de. 1990. Les parcs de Montréal : Des origines à nos jours. Montreal : Éditions du Méridien.

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.

The Terrace at the Look-out

Here is the lookout on Mount Royal in 1910. Many young people are walking there and observing, casually, the city below them. While there are families there, most of the people are young unmarried people strolling in small groups of two or three individuals of the same sex.

Anonymous
McCord Museum of Canadian History - Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
c. 1910
Coloured ink on paper mounted on card - Photolithography
10 x 16 cm
MP-0000.1929-D1
© McCord Museum of Canadian History


To see and be seen.

Fashion-conscious men and women sport their best clothes when they go up to the belvedere atop Mount Royal to admire the landscape. The women's profiles reflect current trends with the help of corsets. Since these women never go out without a hat, their heads are covered by headgear in seasonal colours. A few pins add a whimsical touch, and gloves complete the costume. And even if perfume is more often worn in the evening, some women probably slip a tiny bottle of their favourite perfume into their bag.

To see and be seen.

Fashion-conscious men and women sport their best clothes when they go up to the belvedere atop Mount Royal to admire the landscape. The women's profiles reflect current trends with the help of corsets. Since these women never go out without a hat, their heads are covered by headgear in seasonal colours. A few pins add a whimsical touch, and gloves complete the costume. And even if perfume is more often worn in the evening, some women probably slip a tiny bottle of their favourite perfume into their bag.

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.

Hat

This spring hat is made of green straw and is trimmed with green velvet, ribbon silk, tulle veiling and pink silk roses.

McCord Museum of Canadian History - Gift of Miss L. Morton
c. 1915
11.6 cm
M968.39.4
© McCord Museum of Canadian History


The hat was an essential part of a woman's costume from the 18th century. More than any other accessory, her hat is an expression of a woman's personality and mood.

The size and shape of women's hats changed from season to season, but one factor remained constant - no properly dressed woman went outdoors without one. The hat was a symbol of respectability, but it also gave a woman the opportunity to demonstrate her sense of style. She would get the latest fashion information at a milliner's shop, the source of all the latest styles in a particular season. And when old hats had to be remodelled to serve another year, ribbons and trimmings were found at the milliner's shop.

In spite of its elaborate trim, this hat is quite tailored in shape, suggesting the military look, an important influence on women's fashion during the First World War (1914-1918).
The hat was an essential part of a woman's costume from the 18th century. More than any other accessory, her hat is an expression of a woman's personality and mood.

The size and shape of women's hats changed from season to season, but one factor remained constant - no properly dressed woman went outdoors without one. The hat was a symbol of respectability, but it also gave a woman the opportunity to demonstrate her sense of style. She would get the latest fashion information at a milliner's shop, the source of all the latest styles in a particular season. And when old hats had to be remodelled to serve another year, ribbons and trimmings were found at the milliner's shop.

In spite of its elaborate trim, this hat is quite tailored in shape, suggesting the military look, an important influence on women's fashion during the First World War (1914-1918).

© McCord Museum of Canadian History

Hatpin Holder

This is a decorative, sterling-silver hatpin stand that would have been kept near the mirror of the dressing table in a lady's boudoir.

McCord Museum of Canadian History - Gift of Mrs. William Van Horne

14.7 cm
M973.91.14.1
© McCord Museum of Canadian History


At the turn of the 20th century, hats became very elaborate. They were styled with wide brims and piled with ribbons, artificial flowers, feathers and sometimes even complete birds.

The hatpins used to hold these hats to a woman's hair-do were also ornamented - trimmed with semi-precious stones, pearls, beads and filigree metal. The pins were very long, usually about 25 to 32 cm. Apart from securing the hat, they made a convenient weapon for self-defence in emergency situations!

This hatpin stand is an example of the many small decorative accessories so loved by the Victorians. When holding a number of hat pins, it must have resembled a small bouquet of flowers.
At the turn of the 20th century, hats became very elaborate. They were styled with wide brims and piled with ribbons, artificial flowers, feathers and sometimes even complete birds.

The hatpins used to hold these hats to a woman's hair-do were also ornamented - trimmed with semi-precious stones, pearls, beads and filigree metal. The pins were very long, usually about 25 to 32 cm. Apart from securing the hat, they made a convenient weapon for self-defence in emergency situations!

This hatpin stand is an example of the many small decorative accessories so loved by the Victorians. When holding a number of hat pins, it must have resembled a small bouquet of flowers.

© McCord Museum of Canadian History

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Identify the changes that were operated within Canadian society over two decades (territory, population, economy, etc.);
  • Describe in details changes that he/she is able to observe;
  • Explain and speculate about the reasons that could justify these changes;
  • Make connections between the differences and similarities of the two eras.

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