McGill University Campus

Left:McGill University campus Sherbrooke Street, Montreal. QC, about 1897

Right:McGill University Campus from Roddick Gate, Montreal, QC. Top:after Notman(VIEW-3008)Bottom: after Notman (VIEW-3009). Taken on April 30th, 2000 at 11:35 & 10:57 a.m.

Photographers: Left: William Notman, Right: Andrzej Maciejewski

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.


Date/Time: April 30, 2000, 11:35 & 10:57 a.m.

These two 8 x 10 photographs (duos 20 and 21) were meant to be viewed as a panorama. Like Notman, I set my camera in the middle of the street, but I had to have the Roddick Gates closed behind me so I could concentrate on taking pictures instead of redirecting traffic. I can tell that Notman took the right view (VIEW-3009) first and then the left (VIEW-3008) - not only is the light 25-35 minutes “later” in the left view, but the frame is not quite straight. Likely the camera was set on the tripod for the first shot and then swung to the left. I respected the same time lag when I took my photographs.
Date/Time: April 30, 2000, 11:35 & 10:57 a.m.

These two 8 x 10 photographs (duos 20 and 21) were meant to be viewed as a panorama. Like Notman, I set my camera in the middle of the street, but I had to have the Roddick Gates closed behind me so I could concentrate on taking pictures instead of redirecting traffic. I can tell that Notman took the right view (VIEW-3009) first and then the left (VIEW-3008) - not only is the light 25-35 minutes “later” in the left view, but the frame is not quite straight. Likely the camera was set on the tripod for the first shot and then swung to the left. I respected the same time lag when I took my photographs.

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.

Map

This Map of Montreal depicts the location where the photographs by Notman and Maciejewski were taken.

McCord Museum of Canadian History

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.


At the beginning of the 19th century, McGill University occupied a rural site at the foot of Mount Royal. Over the years, the neighbourhood of the Montreal upper classes, the "Golden Mile," developed around the university. The families of the Anglo-Protestant elite gave the institution substantial donations and bequests. This 1897 photo shows us the growth of the institution, the generosity of its benefactors and the variety of programs it offered. We can see (from left to right) the Redpath Library, the Presbyterian seminary, the Redpath Museum, the Molson Building and the main building of the faculty of arts (in the centre), the faculty of medicine building, and Macdonald engineering, chemistry and physics buildings.

For Francophone Catholics, the establishment of a university program and the construction of a real campus would be a long and arduous process.
At the beginning of the 19th century, McGill University occupied a rural site at the foot of Mount Royal. Over the years, the neighbourhood of the Montreal upper classes, the "Golden Mile," developed around the university. The families of the Anglo-Protestant elite gave the institution substantial donations and bequests. This 1897 photo shows us the growth of the institution, the generosity of its benefactors and the variety of programs it offered. We can see (from left to right) the Redpath Library, the Presbyterian seminary, the Redpath Museum, the Molson Building and the main building of the faculty of arts (in the centre), the faculty of medicine building, and Macdonald engineering, chemistry and physics buildings.

For Francophone Catholics, the establishment of a university program and the construction of a real campus would be a long and arduous process.
Printed Documents
  • Benoît, Michèle, and Roger Gratton. 1991. Pignon sur rue : Les quartiers de Montréal. Montrral : Guérin.
  • Bizier, Hélène-Andrée. 1993. L'Université de Montréal : La quête du savoir. Montreal : Libre Expression.
  • Frost, Stanley Brice. 1980. McGill University for the Advancement of Learning. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press.
  • Gagnon, Robert. 1991. Histoire de l'École polytechnique 1873-1990 : La montée des ingénieurs francophones. Montreal : Éditions du Boréal.
  • Lajeunesse, Marcel. 1982. Les Sulpiciens et la vie culturelle à Montréal au XIXe siècle. Montreal : Fides.
  • Roy, Fernande. 1988. Progrès, harmonie, liberté : Le libéralisme des milieux d'affaires francophones de Montréal au tournant du siècle. Montreal : Boréal Express

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.

St. Denis Street from St. Catherine Street, Montreal

Like McGill University, Université Laval à Montréal was established in the heart of a well-to-do neighbourhood, in the area around St. Denis Street. At the time, the Francophone upper classes of Montreal were concentrated around St. Denis and St. Hubert, between Viger Square and St. Louis Square. This is where big cultural and educational institutions, offices for professionals, restaurants and department stores were usually built. This sector would come to be known as the "Latin Quarter."

Anonymous
McCord Museum of Canadian History - Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
c. 1910
Ink on paper mounted on card - Halftone
16 x 22 cm
MP-0000.840.13
© McCord Museum of Canadian History


The latest thing in campuses!

The new functional and sophisticated-looking buildings on the campus of McGill University are the pride of all those who attend the university. For here we find the ironworks of the Workman Engineering Building, the applied mechanics reading room of the MacDonald Engineering Building, and the new hygiene laboratory of the Medicine Building. These rooms are equipped with the most modern tools and instruments, including the magic lantern which enables some students to attend illustrated lectures.
The latest thing in campuses!

The new functional and sophisticated-looking buildings on the campus of McGill University are the pride of all those who attend the university. For here we find the ironworks of the Workman Engineering Building, the applied mechanics reading room of the MacDonald Engineering Building, and the new hygiene laboratory of the Medicine Building. These rooms are equipped with the most modern tools and instruments, including the magic lantern which enables some students to attend illustrated lectures.

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.

Magic lantern

This magic lantern was operated using a kerosine lamp, although other combustible oils such as vegetable oils and quicklime were also used in magic lanterns before the advent of electricity.It was a very useful tool for illustrating a lecture. It was used extensively at McGill University for teaching purposes.

McCord Museum of Canadian History - Gift of Mr. Richard C. Webster
c. 1879-1900
28.5 x 15.5 cm
M970.92.1.1-4
© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.


The magic lantern is a projector - an optical system used to form the image of an illuminated object on a surface. The principle of image projection has been known since ancient Egypt; however, it took the discovery in the early 19th century of more powerful sources of illumination for magic lanterns to become readily available.

In the first half of the 19th century, magic lantern projections were mostly for entertainment. Among the favoured subjects in magic langern shows were news, travel and exploration. In the last half of the century, magic lanterns, which by then used glass photographic slides, became very popular for educational purposes.

Frank Dawson Adams (1859-1942), the renowned geologist, was one of the first professors at McGill University to use a magic lantern during his lectures. He taught at McGill from 1889 to 1924.
The magic lantern is a projector - an optical system used to form the image of an illuminated object on a surface. The principle of image projection has been known since ancient Egypt; however, it took the discovery in the early 19th century of more powerful sources of illumination for magic lanterns to become readily available.

In the first half of the 19th century, magic lantern projections were mostly for entertainment. Among the favoured subjects in magic langern shows were news, travel and exploration. In the last half of the century, magic lanterns, which by then used glass photographic slides, became very popular for educational purposes.

Frank Dawson Adams (1859-1942), the renowned geologist, was one of the first professors at McGill University to use a magic lantern during his lectures. He taught at McGill from 1889 to 1924.

© McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.

Hygiene Lab

The hygiene laboratory was in the Medical Building at McGill University, on the upper northeast side of the main campus.

Anonymous
McCord Museum of Canadian History - Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
c. 1895
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 8 cm
MP-0000.25.254.1
© McCord Museum of Canadian History


The photograph depicts the new hygiene laboratory in the Medical Building at McGill University. In 1893, Donald Smith (1820-1914), 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal,1 gave $50,000 for a new chair in hygiene. At the same time, J.H.R. Molson provided $60,000 for an expansion of the Medical Building on the northeast side of the campus. That expansion created space for the hygiene laboratory.

It was relatively unusual then for medical students to do laboratory work. Traditionally, doctors trained by sitting in on lecture courses and doing dissections. When William Osler (1849-1919) was appointed to the chair in medicine at McGill he introduced improvements in doctor training, requiring students to take lecture and laboratory courses, followed by clinical training in hospital wards.
The photograph depicts the new hygiene laboratory in the Medical Building at McGill University. In 1893, Donald Smith (1820-1914), 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal,1 gave $50,000 for a new chair in hygiene. At the same time, J.H.R. Molson provided $60,000 for an expansion of the Medical Building on the northeast side of the campus. That expansion created space for the hygiene laboratory.

It was relatively unusual then for medical students to do laboratory work. Traditionally, doctors trained by sitting in on lecture courses and doing dissections. When William Osler (1849-1919) was appointed to the chair in medicine at McGill he introduced improvements in doctor training, requiring students to take lecture and laboratory courses, followed by clinical training in hospital wards.

© 2002, McCord Museum of Canadian History. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Identify the changes that were operated within Canadian society over two decades (territory, population, economy, etc.);
  • Describe in details changes that he/she is able to observe;
  • Explain and speculate about the reasons that could justify these changes;
  • Make connections between the differences and similarities of the two eras.

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