January 3
When the chicks hatch, the divers feed the parents four times a day so that the male and female can give their chicks enough to eat.

January 8
When the chicks are hungry, they peck their parents’ beaks, causing the adults to regurgitate.
At first, the parents regurgitate a fish “stew” for their young.
After one month, the chicks can manage whole fish, although they are still regurgitated by the parents

January 12
Eating at this rate, the chicks grow very quickly.

January 16
The young have been standing up beside their parents for some time already. They are covered with grey and white down.

January 24
The chicks waddle around with their parents and sometimes meet up with other chicks.

January 29
By late January it is time to form a crèche, by bringing all the young of the colony together in one place.
In the wild, a cr Read More
January 3
When the chicks hatch, the divers feed the parents four times a day so that the male and female can give their chicks enough to eat.

January 8

When the chicks are hungry, they peck their parents’ beaks, causing the adults to regurgitate.
At first, the parents regurgitate a fish “stew” for their young.
After one month, the chicks can manage whole fish, although they are still regurgitated by the parents

January 12

Eating at this rate, the chicks grow very quickly.

January 16

The young have been standing up beside their parents for some time already. They are covered with grey and white down.

January 24

The chicks waddle around with their parents and sometimes meet up with other chicks.

January 29

By late January it is time to form a crèche, by bringing all the young of the colony together in one place.
In the wild, a crèche allows both parents to hunt for food, to meet the growing needs of their chicks. It also protects the young ones from the cold and from predators.
At the Biodôme, spending time in the crèche allows the chicks to learn how to be fed by hand and gives them time to moult, away from the colony.

January 31

More than two months after hatching, the chicks have finished moulting and become independent. The parents also renew their plumage once a year, after the mating period.

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved

Feeding the Chick

January 3

When the chicks hatch, the divers feed the parents four times a day so that the male and female can give their chicks enough to eat.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Feeding the Chick

January 8

When the chicks are hungry, they peck their parents’ beaks, causing the adults to regurgitate.

At first, the parents regurgitate a fish “stew” for their young.

After one month, the chicks can manage whole fish, although they are still regurgitated by the parents

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Young standing beside their parents

January 12

Eating at this rate, the chicks grow very quickly.

January 16

The young have been standing up beside their parents for some time already. They are covered with grey and white down.

January 24

The chicks waddle around with their parents and sometimes meet up with other chicks.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


The Young Together

January 29

By late January it is time to form a crèche, by bringing all the young of the colony together in one place.

In the wild, a crèche allows both parents to hunt for food, to meet the growing needs of their chicks. It also protects the young ones from the cold and from predators.

At the Biodôme, spending time in the crèche allows the chicks to learn how to be fed by hand and gives them time to moult, away from the colony.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Gentoo Penguin Moulting

January 31

More than two months after hatching, the chicks have finished moulting and become independent. The parents also renew their plumage once a year, after the mating period.

Biodôme de Montréal

© Biodôme de Montréal, 2005. All rights reserved


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Learn more about the ecosystems in the Americas;
  • Observe the diversity that each ecosystem offers regarding the flora, fauna as well as climate;
  • Identify the elements that shape different ecosystems, such as vegetation, wildlife, soil, etc.;
  • Develop different causes and consequences of human actions on ecosystems (from grade 4);
  • Formulate and justify possible solutions on issues, such as global warming, in order to preserve our ecosystems and biodiversity on Earth (from grade 6).

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