From the late 19th century through to our own day, various companies have produced pop-up Valentines to be sent by friends, families and lovers to express their affection. The three-dimensional character of these cards suggests that that affection envelops the whole of one’s life, but pop-ups have a playful quality as well. These QuickTime 3D images give you an opportunity to see the dynamic quality of pop-up valentines and other valentine greetings and objects and make you discover how this way of viewing museum objects adds to their charm.
From the late 19th century through to our own day, various companies have produced pop-up Valentines to be sent by friends, families and lovers to express their affection. The three-dimensional character of these cards suggests that that affection envelops the whole of one’s life, but pop-ups have a playful quality as well. These QuickTime 3D images give you an opportunity to see the dynamic quality of pop-up valentines and other valentine greetings and objects and make you discover how this way of viewing museum objects adds to their charm.

© 2004, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Love's Greeting Pop-up Valentine, Photo Credit: Synthescape, Inc.

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This Edwardian-era card expresses the vocabulary of Valentine sentiment. A robin perched on Cupid's bow, a beribboned heart, roses, and a pretty child framed by a heart-shaped wreath of forget-me-nots accompany a feminized Cupid. Pastel colours suggest that this is for a child.

971.026.011.8.

9 x 13 x 20,8 cm.

Raphael Tuck
Gift of Mrs. Aubrey C. Bean
c. 1900
London, UNITED KINGDOM
© Doon Heritage Crossroads.


QuickTime Stereoscope

The greeting card represents love, symbolized by a woman reading a message engraved on a tree trunk by Cupid.

Silver print on cardboard.

2001.458.2.

9 x 18 cm.

This greeting card features a stereogram. A stereogram is an image composed of pictures of the same subject, taken from two perspectives, placed side by side, to create an impression of relief. As a result of our binocular vision, each eye perceives a different image, causing the object in the stereogram to appear three-dimensional. Usually, a stereogram is viewed with a stereoscope, but in this case, the illusion of relief has been recreated, thanks to the overlay of the two images in QuickTime.

Photo Credit: Maison Saint-Gabriel

© Maison Saint-Gabriel.


Pop-up Valentine

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What makes this card special is the way it has been assembled. It is maintained by elastics that fold forward when it is opened.

Late 19th–early 20th century. 3-D pop-up, mechanical, cutout, embossed, colour printing, gold leaf.

2003.14.

12.7 x 8.2 x 11.6 cm

Inside the doors: Left side:

“Bid me to live, and I will live thy loving friend to be:
Or bid me love and I will give a loving heart to / thee.”

Right side:

“A heart as soft as kind
a heart as sound as free,
as in the whole world thou can’st find:
that heart I’ll give to thee.”

Photo Credit: Synthescape, Inc.

GERMANY
© Musée Colby-Curtis-Société historique de Stanstead.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Describe the practice of giving Valentine’s greetings
  • Describe the evolution of the imagery and literature as expressions of friendship and affection from the middle ages to the 1920’s
  • Describe the types of symbols traditionally used to represent feelings of love and affection
  • Recognize that expressions of love and affection have traditionally included literature, symbolic objects and gestures
  • Explain how traditional Valentine’s Day greetings are an expression of both material and non-material elements of culture

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