Uniforms and crew memorabilia from TCA employees displayed at the McClure Aviation Museum, Moncton International Airport.

Moncton was designated the eastern terminus of the newly formed Trans Canada Airlines. On October 12, 1937 the Hon. C.D. Howe, Minister of Transport of Canada, announced at the annual dinner of the Maritime Board of Trade that Moncton would be the Maritime terminal for Trans Canada Airlines. On November 2, 1939, the first Trans Canada Airlines flight arrived at the Maritime terminal in Moncton.

Don McClure Aviation Historical Gallery, Moncton International Airport
Jim Sulis
c. 1939
Moncton, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 2008, Don McClure Aviation Historical Gallery, Moncton International Airport. All Rights Reserved.


World’s largest airplane, the Russian Antonov, towers over the control tower at Fredericton International Airport.

Operation Halo was the Canadian Forces contribution of 450 personnel and 6 CH-146 Griffon helicopters to Haiti as part of the United Nations Multinational Interim Taskforce to assist in stabilizing the country. The Canadian contribution was composed of the Second Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment based in CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick, the Canadian Forces Joint Operations Group in Kingston, Ontario, and 430 Tactical Helicopter Squadron based in Valcartier, Quebec. The world’s largest aircraft, the Russian Antonov, was chartered to airlift military equipment between Fredericton Airport and Haiti. The thrust from its engines on takeoff and landing was so great that traffic flow on roads near the airport had to be halted when the Antonov was arriving and leaving.

Greater Fredericton Airport Authority
Melodie Beal
2004-03
Fredericton, CFB Gagetown Oromocto, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 2008, Greater Fredericton Airport Authority. All Rights Reserved.


A rare aviation giant is drawing flocks of airplane enthusiasts to the Fredericton Airport this week.

The Russian-built, Ukrainian-operated Antonov 124-100 is one of the largest aircraft in the world and it is being used to ferry hundreds of soldiers and their equipment from Canadian Forces Base Gagetown to a peacekeeping mission in Haiti.

The plane is so large that its seven-storey-high tail fin sticks up above the airport’s terminal. Its wings are 73.3 metres wide, or almost the length of a football field.

The back blast from the Antonov’s four 2MKB Progress (Lotarev) D18T turbofan engines is so powerful that as a precaution the RCMP closes the nearby highway for 10 minutes when it takes off on the Fredericton Airport’s newly extended runway.

“This is the largest aircraft ever to land in New Brunswick”, said Heather-Anne MacLean, the airport’s director of marketing and business development, Tuesday.

The blue-and-white-painted Antonov 124-100 is 69.1 metres long and has a 24-wheel undercarriage. It weighs 175,000 kilograms empty, according to airliner.net.

Its maximum takeo Read More
A rare aviation giant is drawing flocks of airplane enthusiasts to the Fredericton Airport this week.

The Russian-built, Ukrainian-operated Antonov 124-100 is one of the largest aircraft in the world and it is being used to ferry hundreds of soldiers and their equipment from Canadian Forces Base Gagetown to a peacekeeping mission in Haiti.

The plane is so large that its seven-storey-high tail fin sticks up above the airport’s terminal. Its wings are 73.3 metres wide, or almost the length of a football field.

The back blast from the Antonov’s four 2MKB Progress (Lotarev) D18T turbofan engines is so powerful that as a precaution the RCMP closes the nearby highway for 10 minutes when it takes off on the Fredericton Airport’s newly extended runway.

“This is the largest aircraft ever to land in New Brunswick”, said Heather-Anne MacLean, the airport’s director of marketing and business development, Tuesday.

The blue-and-white-painted Antonov 124-100 is 69.1 metres long and has a 24-wheel undercarriage. It weighs 175,000 kilograms empty, according to airliner.net.

Its maximum takeoff weight is 405,000 kilograms and it can fly 6,500 kilometres at a maximum cruising speed of 865 km/h.

Sixty Antonov 124s have been built and only 20 of them are in commercial service.

Statistics like that drew David Pass and his camera to the airport.

“I have come down to see the Antonov124”, he said. “It is not too often you get to see one anywhere in the world, let along at a small airport like Fredericton”.

“For an aviation enthusiast, this is a chance of a lifetime”.

Pass was studying the aircraft from inside the terminal of the airport and said its size is deceiving because it is parked on the far side of the apron.

“It is really large”, he said. “Its (tail) is like looking at the NB Power building downtown”.

He said he has been up close to an American C-5 transport plane and the Antonov is even larger. Pass said the Antonov 124-100 is used to transport Formula 1 race cars around the world.

He said he is hoping to get a photograph of the plane with someone standing beside it to get some sense of scale.

Pass said he would love to go aboard the Antonov 124 for a tour.

He said he may visit the airport several times during the next few days to try to get a picture of the giant transport plane taking off or landing.

“At a small airport you don’t have to fight the crowds so I can come out and come back”, he said. “If I had to stay for awhile to get a picture I would. This is a very unique situation”.

John Sarty and his friend, Paul Brown, are aircraft engineers who stopped by to look at the giant aircraft. It is the first time they have seen the Antonov 124-100.

“it is nice plane”, said Sarty. “Big”.

“it is the biggest one I have ever seen”, said Brown.

Crystal Seely, her husband Wayne, and their two-year old son, Joseph, drove to the airport to see the Russian transport. She said they live near the airport and her son likes airplanes.

“It’s massive”, she said. “There was an air show here about seven or eight years ago and a plane from Russia flew over but couldn’t land. It was too big”.

She said Joseph just stared at the huge Antonov without saying anything Tuesday.

Another visitor, Troy, who did not want his last name used, said he was just driving past the airport and saw the plane so he stopped for a closer look.

“It is the biggest I have ever seen yet down here”, he said.

Another Russian-made transport plane, an Ilyushin-76, is also flying men and equipment from Fredericton to Haiti. The Ilyushin is smaller than the Antonov.

MacLean said the two planes are expected to make two flights a day from Fredericton to Haiti for the rest of the week.



MASSIVE SIGHT: A crew member of an Antonov Russian cargo plane is dwarfed by the massive aircraft while checking the front landing gear prior to takeoff at the Fredericton Airport on Tuesday. The plane, with a tail fin that towers over the airport terminal, is carrying military cargo to Haiti for the Canadian troops who are leaving from Canadian Forces Base Gagetown.

© 2004, The Daily Gleaner. All Rights Reserved.

The first visit of the new CC-177 Globemaster troop carrier to Fredericton International Airport in 2007.

One of Canada's new heavy-lift aircraft for the Canadian Forces is making quick work of transporting equipment from Canadian Forces Base Gagetown in New Brunswick to a training exercise in Alberta. The new CC-177 Globemaster is an imposing site at the Fredericton airport where two air defence anti-tank systems have been loaded for the flight to Cold Lake, Alta. The military took ownership of the huge aircraft last Thursday - the second of four it will own by next April. Aircraft commander, Maj. Jeremy Reynolds says when compared to the old Hercules aircraft, the Globemaster allows him to move more than twice the payload, over a longer distance, and in a shorter amount of time. The Globemaster has a wingspan of almost 52 metres. Reynolds says despite their size, the new planes have the latest computer technology and handle like a small aircraft. In the past, Canada has often had to lease such aircraft to transport troops and equipment to places like Haiti and Afghanistan.

Greater Fredericton Airport Authority
Melodie Beal
2007-10-03
Fredericton, CFB Gagetown Oromocto, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 2008, Greater Fredericton Airport Authority. All Rights Reserved.


The Blissville Airport was built in the late 1930s as part of the Trans Canada Airways system. Airports and navigation systems were built approximately 100 miles (160kms) apart, covering Canada coast to coast, to facilitate air mail and eventually passenger traffic. It was located about 30 miles (50km) SW of Fredericton on a dusty gravel road and didn’t see the first scheduled TCA flight until May 10, 1941 a stop on the Montreal to Halifax route. Evidently it wasn’t too successful as the trial ended six weeks later on June 15.

On July 1, 1944 Blissville was again added to the TCA route, becoming a regional airport for SW New Brunswick, and this time it was promoted with direct cab service both to Fredericton and Saint John. The distance to Saint John was about 35-40 miles (50-60km) SE, halfway being on dirt roads. TCA pulled out of Blissville when the Airport at Pennfield Ridge was opened up to serve Saint John on April 1, 1947. The terminal/operations building was later disassembled and moved in sections to serve the same purpose at the new Fredericton Airport (YFC) until a new terminal was built there in 1963.

Over the last several decades, th Read More

The Blissville Airport was built in the late 1930s as part of the Trans Canada Airways system. Airports and navigation systems were built approximately 100 miles (160kms) apart, covering Canada coast to coast, to facilitate air mail and eventually passenger traffic. It was located about 30 miles (50km) SW of Fredericton on a dusty gravel road and didn’t see the first scheduled TCA flight until May 10, 1941 a stop on the Montreal to Halifax route. Evidently it wasn’t too successful as the trial ended six weeks later on June 15.

On July 1, 1944 Blissville was again added to the TCA route, becoming a regional airport for SW New Brunswick, and this time it was promoted with direct cab service both to Fredericton and Saint John. The distance to Saint John was about 35-40 miles (50-60km) SE, halfway being on dirt roads. TCA pulled out of Blissville when the Airport at Pennfield Ridge was opened up to serve Saint John on April 1, 1947. The terminal/operations building was later disassembled and moved in sections to serve the same purpose at the new Fredericton Airport (YFC) until a new terminal was built there in 1963.

Over the last several decades, the Blissville Airport has been used by Forest Protection Ltd. as a base for fighting forest fires and conducting spraying operations. It is now located just inside the boundary of CFB Gagetown with a 4000 foot (1200m) paved runway and a Military Airport code – CCH3.

(adapted from article by George Brien that appeared in the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum Newsletter, Fall 2007)
© 2008, Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum Newsletter. All Rights Reserved.

Pan American Airlines chose the protective harbour of Shediac Bay for a stop in its transatlantic flights to Europe.

In 1939 Pan American Airlines used Shediac as a stop on its regular transatlantic service between New York and Southampton, England. Among dignitaries arriving in Shediac on the Clipper III craft were actors Bob Hope and Edward G. Robinson, and Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands. A Customs House and the administration offices for Pan Am were established at Pointe du Chêne. The onset of war in the fall of 1939 led to the cancellation of this service.

Don McClure Aviation Historical Gallery, Moncton International Airport
1939-06
Shediac, New Brunswick, CANADA
New York, UNITED STATES
© 2008, Don McClure Aviation Historical Gallery, Moncton International Airport. All Rights Reserved.


The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan graduated over 150,000 personnel in the field of aviation during World War II.

Shortly after the beginning of World War II, Prime Minister McKenzie King promoted the establishment of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan whereby airmen from throughout the Commonwealth could be trained throughout Canada, away from the threat of hostilities in Europe. A total of 131,553 pilots, navigators, bomb aimers, wireless operators, air gunners and flight engineers were trained under this program. In 2003 the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering erected a plaque in the McClure Aviation Museum at the Moncton International Airport recognizing the Moncton No. 8 Service Flying Training School as a National Historic Civil Engineering Site.

Don McClure Aviation Historical Gallery, Moncton International Airport
1939 - 1945
Pennfield Ridge, Chatham, Moncton, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 2008, Don McClure Aviation Historical Gallery, Moncton International Airport. All Rights Reserved.


CFB Chatham served as an air force base for over half a century.

A 1946 photo of a large two-prop plane across from the airport terminal at Chatham airport.

New Brunswick Provincial Archives/New Brunswick Travel Bureau – County Series Fonds
c. 1946
Miramichi City (Chatham), New Brunswick, CANADA
P-93-N-315
© 2008, New Brunswick Provincial Archives . All Rights Reserved.


Chatham was selected for a World War Two airfield because of the large average number of clear flying days per year. RCAF Station Chatham became an operational field under Eastern Air Commands. With U-boat activity in the Gulf of St Lawrence, between 9 September and 13 December1942, Hudsons from 113 (Bomber-Reconnaissance) Squadron were stationed at RCAF Chatham as a "special Submarine Hunting Detachment". On two occasions Pilot Officer R.S. Keetley, flying Hudsons from Chatham spotted U-boats in the Gulf. With the return of U-boats in the Gulf, No 119 (BR) Squadron operated from Chatham from 13 April to 2 December 1943.

It was also the location of training units of No 3 Training Command of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. No 21 Elementary Flying Training School for pilots was located there from mid 1941 to mid 1942 and No 10 Air Observer School from mid 1941 to the end of the war, training both navigators and wireless operators. The air observer school was run by a local civilian group headed by R.H. Bibby, an experienced bush pilot. They trained a total of 131,553 air crew from around the world.

In 1949, RCAF Station Chatham saw the start Read More

Chatham was selected for a World War Two airfield because of the large average number of clear flying days per year. RCAF Station Chatham became an operational field under Eastern Air Commands. With U-boat activity in the Gulf of St Lawrence, between 9 September and 13 December1942, Hudsons from 113 (Bomber-Reconnaissance) Squadron were stationed at RCAF Chatham as a "special Submarine Hunting Detachment". On two occasions Pilot Officer R.S. Keetley, flying Hudsons from Chatham spotted U-boats in the Gulf. With the return of U-boats in the Gulf, No 119 (BR) Squadron operated from Chatham from 13 April to 2 December 1943.

It was also the location of training units of No 3 Training Command of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. No 21 Elementary Flying Training School for pilots was located there from mid 1941 to mid 1942 and No 10 Air Observer School from mid 1941 to the end of the war, training both navigators and wireless operators. The air observer school was run by a local civilian group headed by R.H. Bibby, an experienced bush pilot. They trained a total of 131,553 air crew from around the world.

In 1949, RCAF Station Chatham saw the start of the “Jet Age”, when Vampires and F-86 Sabre fighter jets were stationed there. Between the late 1950s and early 1960s the famous Golden Hawks aerobatic team made Chatham its home. The last F-86 Sabre left Chatham on February 19th, 1969 for the National Aviation Museum in Ottawa.

The next era began in 1962 with the arrival of #416 All Weather Squadron flying CF-101 Voodoos jet fighters. The Voodoos remained until 1984 when #416 Squadron was disbanded. During this period of the Cold War, the airfield had a US controlled storage facilities for nuclear warheads. In the summer of 1985, #416 Squadron was replaced by #434 Tactical Fighter Squadron flying CF-5 Freedom Fighters. On June 13th, 1989 #434 Squadron was disbanded, ending the air force present on the base.

With the coming of integration of the armed forces, the station assumed the name of Canadian Forces Base Chatham. For a short period before the Base was finally closed in 1996, it was home to the Anti-Aircraft Artillery School and an operational Anti-Aircraft Battery.


© 2008, New Brunswick Military Heritage Project. All Rights Reserved.

Pennfield Ridge in southwestern New Brunswick was chosen as a site for training aircrew as part of the BCATP.

The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan developed a total of 151 training schools across Canada and RCAF Station Pennfield was one of three built in New Brunswick. Pennfield Ridge grew from a community of 188 people in 1939 to approximately 5,000 in 1942, complete with hospital, theatre, dance hall, sport facilities, and restaurants.

New Brunswick Military Heritage Project
1941 - 1944
Pennfield Ridge, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 2008, New Brunswick Military Heritage Project. All Rights Reserved.


The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan developed a total of 151 training schools across Canada and RCAF Station Pennfield was one of three built in New Brunswick. In November 1940, a half million dollar contract was awarded to build a facility at Pennfield Ridge. From mid 1941 to May 1942 the station was home to No 2 Air Navigation School. This school conducted a four week intensive course on astro navigation, designed to qualify students for night navigation.

From Pennfield Ridge this school was relocated to Rivers, Manitoba. After the fall of France, it was decided to move four operational training units (OTUs) from Great Britain to Canada. Once airmen had successfully learned their trade, they were sent to an OTU for operational training on a particular aircraft and for a particular task. No 34 Operational Training Unit was sent from Greenoch, Scotland to RCAF Station Pennfield Ridge in April 1942. This station was part of No 3 Training Command of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and both the RCAF and RAF shared the responsibility for running the base and school.

It had Lockheed Venturas, a light bomber, for the training of four man-crews for Bo Read More

The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan developed a total of 151 training schools across Canada and RCAF Station Pennfield was one of three built in New Brunswick. In November 1940, a half million dollar contract was awarded to build a facility at Pennfield Ridge. From mid 1941 to May 1942 the station was home to No 2 Air Navigation School. This school conducted a four week intensive course on astro navigation, designed to qualify students for night navigation.

From Pennfield Ridge this school was relocated to Rivers, Manitoba. After the fall of France, it was decided to move four operational training units (OTUs) from Great Britain to Canada. Once airmen had successfully learned their trade, they were sent to an OTU for operational training on a particular aircraft and for a particular task. No 34 Operational Training Unit was sent from Greenoch, Scotland to RCAF Station Pennfield Ridge in April 1942. This station was part of No 3 Training Command of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and both the RCAF and RAF shared the responsibility for running the base and school.

It had Lockheed Venturas, a light bomber, for the training of four man-crews for Bomber Command. The course for pilots and wireless operators was 12 weeks long and for air observers it was 8 weeks. Each group trained separately at first and in the final stage trained as a crew. It was operational from May 1942 to June 1944. Occasional operational missions were flown from this airfield into the Atlantic Ocean. The station experienced a number of difficulties due to serviceability problems with Venturas, persistent fog, and a lack of operationally trained instructors.

Pennfield Ridge grew from a community of 188 people in 1939 to approximately 5,000 in 1942, complete with hospital, theatre, dance hall, sport facilities, and restaurants. After the war, most of the station buildings were dismantled and sold.


© 2008, New Brunswick Military Heritage Project. All Rights Reserved.

By the fall of 1941, the Saint John airfield was one of six operational fields in Eastern Air Command of the RCAF. Stationed at the municipal airport at Millidgeville there from 1 November 1939 to 27 September 1940 was a flight of 2 (Army Cooperation) Squadron, flying four Armstrong-Whitworth Atlas aircraft. These were soon after replaced by modern Westland Lysanders (Picture available in Douglas - The Creation of a National Air Force).

In the fall of 1939 a hanger and other buildings were built for the RCAF detachment at Millidgeville. No 2 Squadron was replaced by 118 (Coastal Artillery Co-operation) Squadron from 1 November 1939 to 27 September 1940. The 118 Squadron was renumbered 1 (Coast Artillery Co-operation) Detachment and it remained until 1 April 1944. By the end of January 1944 1 (CAC) had been made redundant by army radar equipment, it was first transferred to Dartmouth and then disbanded.

Shortly after RCAF Station Saint John was closed as part of the East Coast Air Defence Radar Coverage, #23 Radio Unit (Ground Control Intercept radar) was located at Saint John.

By the fall of 1941, the Saint John airfield was one of six operational fields in Eastern Air Command of the RCAF. Stationed at the municipal airport at Millidgeville there from 1 November 1939 to 27 September 1940 was a flight of 2 (Army Cooperation) Squadron, flying four Armstrong-Whitworth Atlas aircraft. These were soon after replaced by modern Westland Lysanders (Picture available in Douglas - The Creation of a National Air Force).

In the fall of 1939 a hanger and other buildings were built for the RCAF detachment at Millidgeville. No 2 Squadron was replaced by 118 (Coastal Artillery Co-operation) Squadron from 1 November 1939 to 27 September 1940. The 118 Squadron was renumbered 1 (Coast Artillery Co-operation) Detachment and it remained until 1 April 1944. By the end of January 1944 1 (CAC) had been made redundant by army radar equipment, it was first transferred to Dartmouth and then disbanded.

Shortly after RCAF Station Saint John was closed as part of the East Coast Air Defence Radar Coverage, #23 Radio Unit (Ground Control Intercept radar) was located at Saint John.


© 2008, New Brunswick Military Heritage Project. All Rights Reserved.

It was an operational station with 164 (Transport) Squadron stationed there from 20 January 1943 to 30 September 1945. No 8 Service Flying Training School, part of No 3 Training Command of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan was established in Moncton for pilot training in December 1940, 16 weeks a head of schedule, although handicapped by a shortage of aircraft.

After completing their initial training course, those selected for pilot training went to Moncton for a seven week elementary flying training. The failure rate in this phase was about 25%. In January 1944 it was moved to Weyburn, Saskatchewan. No 31 Personnel Depot was also located at Moncton, a reception centre for members of the RAF moving to and from Canada and the United States. No 2 Embarkation Depot was also located in Moncton

It was an operational station with 164 (Transport) Squadron stationed there from 20 January 1943 to 30 September 1945. No 8 Service Flying Training School, part of No 3 Training Command of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan was established in Moncton for pilot training in December 1940, 16 weeks a head of schedule, although handicapped by a shortage of aircraft.

After completing their initial training course, those selected for pilot training went to Moncton for a seven week elementary flying training. The failure rate in this phase was about 25%. In January 1944 it was moved to Weyburn, Saskatchewan. No 31 Personnel Depot was also located at Moncton, a reception centre for members of the RAF moving to and from Canada and the United States. No 2 Embarkation Depot was also located in Moncton


© 2008, New Brunswick Military Heritage Project. All Rights Reserved.

The Governor-General, the Duke of Connaught, with Senator G.P. Burchill visits Chatham during World War II.

Since the middle of the twentieth century it became common for visiting dignitaries to arrive in New Brunswick by air, rather than by ship or train. The Governor General of Canada, the Duke of Connaught, with Senator G.P. Burchill, president of #10 AOS at Chatham, during World War II.

CFB Chatham
c. 1943
Miramichi City (Chatham), New Brunswick, CANADA
© 1989, Col. A.M. Lee. All Rights Reserved.


Queen Elizabeth II at Fredericton Airport in 1959.

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh are greeted at Fredericton airport by Lieutenant-Governor J.L. O’Brien and brigadier E.C. Brown, 28 July 1959.

New Brunswick Provincial Archives
1959-07-28
Fredericton, New Brunswick, CANADA
PANB P374-3
© 2008, New Brunswick Provincial Archives. All Rights Reserved.


Queen Elizabeth II inspecting troops at CFB Chatham in 1976.

Queen Elizabeth II inspecting the guard of honour at CFB Chatham with Guard Commander Major M.E. Copeland and Base Commander Colonel Paul Manson, 16 July 1976.

New Brunswick Provincial Archives
1976-07-16
CFB Chatham, New Brunswick, CANADA
PANB P229-25
© 2008, New Brunswick Provincial Archives. All Rights Reserved.


Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh at Moncton Airport in 1984.

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh wave to the crowd at Moncton airport, 24 September 1984. New Brunswick was the welcoming province for their 1984 tour of Canada.

New Brunswick Provincial Archives
1984-09-24
Moncton, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 1984, New Brunswick Provincial Archives. All Rights Reserved.


Senator John F. Kennedy arriving in Saint John in 1957.

Senator John F. Kennedy arriving in Saint John October 1957. The future President of the United States was on his way to Fredericton to receive an honorary degree from the University of New Brunswick.

Saint John Airport Authority
Vintage Photo and frame
c. 1957
Saint John, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 2008, Saint John Airport Authority. All Rights Reserved.


Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau Visits CFB Chatham in 1969.

A smiling Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau chats with BComd, Col Arnie Bauer, after his first supersonic flight in AC 17460 on 18 May 1969.

CFB Chatham
1969-05-18
CFB Chatham, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 1989, Col. A.M. Lee. All Rights Reserved.


Singer Anne Murray is made an Honourary Colonel of 416 Squadron, CFB Chatham in 1972.

Singer Anne Murray was made an Honorary Member of 416 Squadron stationed at CFB Chatham. On her right is the CO, Col J.L. Twambley, Col. Ken Thorneycroft, BComd, is on Anne’s left. The event took place in the Officers’ Mess, 21 December 1972.

CFB Chatham
1972-12-21
CFB Chatham, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 1989, Col. A.M. Lee. All Rights Reserved.


Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, MP Bud Jardine, and his wife, Phyllis. Mr. Mulroney visited Chatham on 16 October 1987 to open the new REPAP mill. He had attended and graduated from St. Thomas High School in Chatham.

CFB Chatham
1987-10-16
CFB Chatham, New Brunswick, CANADA
© 1989, Col. A.M. Lee. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

Students will learn that many locations throughout New Brunswick were chosen as landing facilities for various types of aircraft. They will be introduced to dignitaries whose visits to New Brunswick began with their arrival at an airport. They will learn about unique international programs and aircraft that have become a part of the history and the heritage of this province.


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