Although the 1999 Games, to be held in Fargo, North Dakota, were cancelled, the 2002 Games demonstrated the strength of the NAIG vision.

The 2002 Aboriginal multi-sport and cultural celebration, July 25-August 4, was the largest gathering of its kind in Canadian history: 27 provinces/territories and states were represented Close to 20,000 First Nation, Métis, Inuit and Native American people participated either as athletes, performers or volunteers Over 3,000 Indigenous Peoples staged performances in the Cultural Village Four separate Tribal Journeys finished at The Forks, the historical meeting place of the Fur Trade era, just prior to the Opening Ceremonies 20,686 people attended the Opening Ceremonies; over 10,000 spectators came to see the Closing Ceremonies It’s estimated that over 40,000 saw some part of the Games

Although the 1999 Games, to be held in Fargo, North Dakota, were cancelled, the 2002 Games demonstrated the strength of the NAIG vision.

The 2002 Aboriginal multi-sport and cultural celebration, July 25-August 4, was the largest gathering of its kind in Canadian history:

  • 27 provinces/territories and states were represented
  • Close to 20,000 First Nation, Métis, Inuit and Native American people participated either as athletes, performers or volunteers
  • Over 3,000 Indigenous Peoples staged performances in the Cultural Village
  • Four separate Tribal Journeys finished at The Forks, the historical meeting place of the Fur Trade era, just prior to the Opening Ceremonies
  • 20,686 people attended the Opening Ceremonies; over 10,000 spectators came to see the Closing Ceremonies
  • It’s estimated that over 40,000 saw some part of the Games

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Winnipeg

North American Indigenous Games

www.keithlevitphotography.com

Winnipeg, Manitoba, CANADA
© www.keithlevitphotography.com


16 sports were contested: Archery, Athletics, Badminton, Baseball, Basketball, Boxing, Canoeing, Golf, Field Lacrosse, Rifle Shooting, Soccer, Softball, Swimming, Tae Kwan Do, Volleyball and Wrestling 5,428 athletes and 717 coaches attended, with 70% being Canadian and 30% being American Basketball had the most competitors, with over 1,000 athletes (22%) Manitoba won the team title for the first time, with the largest representation of over a 1,000 participants. Team New Mexico won the John Fletcher Spirit Award, given to the team that demonstrates the spirit of teamwork, fair play, respect and integrity throughout the competition.

Four distinct Tribal Journeys and the Cultural Village were the main cultural attractions There were 80 hours of free performances given by more than 45 artists, including Tom Jackson, Susan Aglukark, Eagle and Hawk, Lucie Idlout, Ulali

16 sports were contested: Archery, Athletics, Badminton, Baseball, Basketball, Boxing, Canoeing, Golf, Field Lacrosse, Rifle Shooting, Soccer, Softball, Swimming, Tae Kwan Do, Volleyball and Wrestling

  • 5,428 athletes and 717 coaches attended, with 70% being Canadian and 30% being American
  • Basketball had the most competitors, with over 1,000 athletes (22%)
  • Manitoba won the team title for the first time, with the largest representation of over a 1,000 participants.
  • Team New Mexico won the John Fletcher Spirit Award, given to the team that demonstrates the spirit of teamwork, fair play, respect and integrity throughout the competition.

Four distinct Tribal Journeys and the Cultural Village were the main cultural attractions

  • There were 80 hours of free performances given by more than 45 artists, including Tom Jackson, Susan Aglukark, Eagle and Hawk, Lucie Idlout, Ulali

© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

The sport and cultural events

Video compilation.

North American Indigenous Games
Video: 2002 North American Indigenous Games Host Society, (Winnipeg) Inc., "North American Indigenous Games Presentation Video"

© North American Indigenous Games Host Society


The importance of the NAIG is evident in its participation. It reflects the desire of the North American Indigenous People to excel, and to celebrate and share their rich cultural heritage. The Games make a difference!

According to Elder Charles Woods and The Honourable Yvon Dumont, the Games are important, not only to the Indigenous Peoples but to all North Americans. Click on the speaker icons on the right to hear their views.

The NAIG will continue, with the fifth Games to be held in Buffalo, New York. "After all, these Games are ours! ... These Games are the pride of our Nation."
The importance of the NAIG is evident in its participation. It reflects the desire of the North American Indigenous People to excel, and to celebrate and share their rich cultural heritage. The Games make a difference!

According to Elder Charles Woods and The Honourable Yvon Dumont, the Games are important, not only to the Indigenous Peoples but to all North Americans. Click on the speaker icons on the right to hear their views.

The NAIG will continue, with the fifth Games to be held in Buffalo, New York. "After all, these Games are ours! ... These Games are the pride of our Nation."
(Elder Cecil Desjarlais, Co-Chairperson Manitoba Aboriginal Sport and Recreation Council)
© 2002, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

The vision will continue

"Generally, the original vision, in my humble opinion, has been met to some extent. But we cannot, you know, not pay attention; we cannot become complacent. We must continue to strive and work towards achieving some ways and means to help the young people."

Charles Wood
North American Indigenous Games Host Society

© North American Indigenous Games Host Society


Yvon Dumont

"Yes, I think the North American Indigenous Games movement is growing stronger every year. Every time that we have a Games, the organization gets stronger. . . [The Games are] an important part, an integral part of North American culture. This is not just an Aboriginal cultural celebration, it’s a celebration of a very important part of North America’s heritage. . ."

Yvon Dumont
North American Indigenous Games Host Society

© North American Indigenous Games Host Society


Closing Ceremonies

North American Indigenous Games

www.keithlevitphotography.com

© www.keithlevitphotography.com


Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Describe the activities and events that take place at the North American Indigenous Games (NAIG)
  • Recognize the contributions of individuals to the NAIG
  • Understand the benefits of the NAIG to Aboriginal society

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