The context: Some religions have personified the concepts of Good and Evil in the form of mythical or symbolic figures. Catholicism is one such religion, particularly in the late nineteenth century, when the clergy had a stranglehold on practically every aspect of life: education, health, natality, holidays, etc. The devil’s presence in sermons, works of art and even Quebec legends is a good example of this. Later, cinema also contributed greatly to shaping our image of “baddies” with its plethora of characters, each more threatening than the last. Now it’s your turn to create a devilishly formidable character!


Material required:
- A computer with an Internet connection
- Access to the site (address of the virtual exhibition)
- Newspapers or magazines that images can be cut out of
- Scissors, glue, large sheet of paper

Getting started:
Catholic churches are full of works or art which represent different aspects of this religion. Ask the students if they have seen such works (in church or i Read More
The context: Some religions have personified the concepts of Good and Evil in the form of mythical or symbolic figures. Catholicism is one such religion, particularly in the late nineteenth century, when the clergy had a stranglehold on practically every aspect of life: education, health, natality, holidays, etc. The devil’s presence in sermons, works of art and even Quebec legends is a good example of this. Later, cinema also contributed greatly to shaping our image of “baddies” with its plethora of characters, each more threatening than the last. Now it’s your turn to create a devilishly formidable character!


Material required:
- A computer with an Internet connection
- Access to the site (address of the virtual exhibition)
- Newspapers or magazines that images can be cut out of
- Scissors, glue, large sheet of paper

Getting started:
Catholic churches are full of works or art which represent different aspects of this religion. Ask the students if they have seen such works (in church or in a museum). What were they: paintings, sculpture, precious metalwork? Did they depict persons or figures?
While Judaism and Islam, for example, do not employ depictions of holy figures in their places of worship, Catholicism makes abundant use of them, to personify Good and Evil for example. Have the students ever seen depictions of Good (angels for example) or Evil (the devil for example)? What form did the devil take in the works they have seen? What sort of visual signs let us know that we are looking at an embodiment of Evil?
Catholicism was a powerful force in nineteenth-century Quebec. The clergy taught in schools and ran hospitals; parish priests watched over the faithful and made sure that they observed religious values and rituals and that they attended Mass on Sunday. Holidays were religious in nature, even the national holiday, St Jean Baptiste day. Religion’s omnipresence in society could be seen in particular in works of visual art, literature and music. The figure of the devil, for example, who represented Evil—straying from religious values, sinning—can be found there. What forms did he take at the time? What forms might he take today?

Carrying out the project: Creating a work of art inspired by a symbol of Evil: A monster

ACTIVITIES:
1. Read or look at tales or legends from Quebec in which the devil appears, particularly in versions written by nineteenth-century authors:
- La chasse-galerie (Honoré Beaugrand, 1900)
- Le Diable beau danseur (Philippe-Aubert de Gaspéfils)
- Le diable des Forges (Louis Fréchette)

2. Do a search in the Discover Quebec and Canadian Art exhibition for the term religion. Compile and observe works made in the nineteenth century or made by artists born in the nineteenth century: Which figures are depicted in them? Are there any threatening ones?

3. Take a close look in particular at the sculptures by Alfred Laliberté. Find the details which identify the devil.

4. Discuss legendary monstrous or threatening figures. What gives a figure a threatening appearance? Make reference to films that are well known to youngsters (Harry Potter, The Chronicles of Narnia, Twilight, etc.)

5. Cut out of magazines or newspapers objects, details (an eye, a hand, etc.) or forms which could be parts of a monster. Identify what the students find ugly, horrible and threatening (spiders, for example) and include them in the figures they create (spiders will become hair, for example).

6. Use a pencil to sketch the monster’s principal features and add details with collage. Don’t be afraid to exaggerate certain parts to create the most repulsive figure possible. Go back over the image with a felt pen and erase the pencil. Add colour if necessary using gouache or felt pens.

7. Present the monsters in class.

Resources:
Virtual exhibition Discover Quebec and Canadian Art
Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ):
• La chasse-galerie, Honoré Beaugrand http://beq.ebooksgratuits.com/pdf/Beaugrand-legendes.pdf
TV5 Monde:
• Rose Latulippe (Le Diable beau danseur) http://www.tv5.org/cms/chaine-francophone/lf/Tous-les-dossiers-et-les-publications-LF/Legendes-canadiennes/toutes-les-videos/p-22532-Rose-Latulipe.htm
Our roots:
• Contes et légendes des vieilles forges – Le diable des Forges (Louis Fréchette) http://www.ourroots.ca/page.aspx?id=405884&qryID=4da87a5e-950d-40eb-afa3-f8c173882637

© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.

On a flat stretch of rock, the archangel St. Michael prepares to strike the part-human, part-animal creature with his sword.

Thomas-Henry Valin Saint-Eustache, Quebec, 1810 - Saint-Eustache 1850 After Raphael (1483-1520) Saint Michael the Archangel Slaying the Demon 1837 Oil on canvas 239,3 x 187,7 cm Gift of the Sisters of Charity of Montreal, "Grey Nuns"

Thomas-Henry Valin
19th Century
© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


Stylized, primitive wayside cross depicting Christ’s crucifixion.

Pierre Plante Sainte-Victoire-de-Sorel, Quebec, 1853 - Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec, 1930 Calvary From Sainte-Victoire-de-Sorel 1888 409.5 x 250 x 65 cm Purchase, Horsley and Annie Townsend Bequest

Pierre Plante
19th Century
© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


Scene depicting a crowd of armed soldiers. The light is focused on Jesus and on a man on the ground being attac

Antoine Plamondon L'Ancienne-Lorette, Quebec, 1884 - Neuville, Quebec, 1895 After Jacques Stella (1596-1657) The Arrest of the Christ 1839 Oil on canvas 154,3 x 239, 4 cm purchase, Horsley and Annie Townsend Bequest

Antoine Plamondon
19th Century
© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


The Virgin folds her hands on her breast. Her blue jacket is decorated with fleurs de lys over a pink dress with go

Joseph Pépin Sault-au-Récollet(Quebec) 1770 - Saint-Vincent-de-Paul (Quebec) The Virgin Mary 1811 Polychromed wood 196 x 72 x 40 cm Gift of The Honourable Serge Joyal, P.C., O.C.

Joseph Pépin

© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


Religious object with vegetal and geometric decorations.

Laurent Amiot Quebec City, 1764 — Quebec City, 1839 Censer 2nd half of 19th c. Silver 26.8 cm (height,) 13.3 cm (diameter), 965.3 g (with chane) Gift of the Honourable Serge Joyal, P.C., O.C., in honour of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts' 150th anniversary 2011.66.1-2

Laurent Amiot

© 2013, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

Language of instruction (English/French), Ethics and Religious culture, Culture and Society (history):

• Analyze works of art from Quebec and elsewhere: literature, visual arts and cinema
• Explore Quebec’s cultural and religious heritage from the nineteenth century
• Recognize religious expression in Quebec as playing a role in society

Visual Arts:

• Appreciate works of art from our artistic heritage: the nineteenth century
• Identify characteristic elements of a stereotype (mythical or supernatural being) in works of art
• Explore ideas inspired by works of art
• Create one’s own image of a stereotype (mythical or supernatural being)
• Use various materials to create a work of art: pencil, felt pen, gouache, collage
• Give an account of one’s creative experience


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