This puzzle depicts street hawkers and tradesmen - a street sweeper, glazier, tinker, orange seller, chestnut vendor, water seller, chimney sweep and coconut seller.

The word "puzzle" appeared in 1901 from the English term "jigsaw puzzle", referring to the puzzlement of the player who had to put a picture together that had been cut out in an erratic, irregular way. The first English puzzles were maps. Puzzles provided an opportunity to portray scenes of everyday life like the small tradesmen depicted here. These images of city life are also captured by photographers like Doisneau and Atget.

Today, children’s puzzles often feature heroes from movies or comic strips.
This puzzle depicts street hawkers and tradesmen - a street sweeper, glazier, tinker, orange seller, chestnut vendor, water seller, chimney sweep and coconut seller.

The word "puzzle" appeared in 1901 from the English term "jigsaw puzzle", referring to the puzzlement of the player who had to put a picture together that had been cut out in an erratic, irregular way. The first English puzzles were maps. Puzzles provided an opportunity to portray scenes of everyday life like the small tradesmen depicted here. These images of city life are also captured by photographers like Doisneau and Atget.

Today, children’s puzzles often feature heroes from movies or comic strips.

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

puzzle

Game of strategy, 20 pieces

Musée de la Vie Bourguignonne
Canadian Heritage Information Network
c. 1930
Wood and paper
235x332
© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


The train consists of a four-wheeled locomotive and two open carriages with four wheels, hooked together by metal chains. Each unit is detachable. The first railway used in France dates back to 1823. Travelling by train was a real event, especially in the country. If you didn’t have the opportunity or the money to take the train, you could at least watch it go past.

Because toys are a reflection of progress, this object of wonderment was naturally reproduced in toy form. Trains could be found at all price levels, in wood for the less wealthy and later in painted tin. As time passed and new innovations appeared, all means of locomotion like cars, trucks and aeroplanes were reproduced as toys.
The train consists of a four-wheeled locomotive and two open carriages with four wheels, hooked together by metal chains. Each unit is detachable. The first railway used in France dates back to 1823. Travelling by train was a real event, especially in the country. If you didn’t have the opportunity or the money to take the train, you could at least watch it go past.

Because toys are a reflection of progress, this object of wonderment was naturally reproduced in toy form. Trains could be found at all price levels, in wood for the less wealthy and later in painted tin. As time passed and new innovations appeared, all means of locomotion like cars, trucks and aeroplanes were reproduced as toys.

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

toy

Train with two carriages

Musée de la Vie Bourguignonne
Canadian Heritage Information Network
c. 1930
Painted wood
102x635x114
© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


On the cover of a rectangular cardboard box., a picture shows two children contemplating their handiwork. These toys were often called "building sets". This play set comprises twenty-eight pieces in different colours and shapes, some of which represent gables, windows, doors and a clock. Children can imagine a variety of structures, develop their sense of observation and organize spaces. And for a few moments, they will be able to pretend they are grown-up architects in the world of adults.

Structures could be expanded by buying additional boxes of pieces. After a period in which they were produced in new materials like metal or plastic, these construction sets are once again being made in wood.
On the cover of a rectangular cardboard box., a picture shows two children contemplating their handiwork. These toys were often called "building sets". This play set comprises twenty-eight pieces in different colours and shapes, some of which represent gables, windows, doors and a clock. Children can imagine a variety of structures, develop their sense of observation and organize spaces. And for a few moments, they will be able to pretend they are grown-up architects in the world of adults.

Structures could be expanded by buying additional boxes of pieces. After a period in which they were produced in new materials like metal or plastic, these construction sets are once again being made in wood.

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

toy

Construction set

Musée de la Vie Bourguignonne
Canadian Heritage Information Network

Wood and cardboard
250x165
86.60.139 (1 - 30)
© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Tops are pear-shaped but apart from this they can be executed in a wide variety of finishes and made to spin in a number of different ways. This sailor top is operated by pulling on a string wound around its axis of rotation.

Some tops were not activated by hand but made to spin by whipping them with a flexible cane. Many tops had an iron point at the bottom that helped to make them last longer and that also allowed the top to spin faster. Manufacturers also played with colour because multicoloured tops blur into a single colour as they turn.

Tops are inexpensive toys that are still popular today. Children have always been fascinated by sailors’ exploits and shipwrecks. They "are such stuff as dreams are made on" because by imagining themselves as sailors, children could travel the world. Children also liked French sailors’ costumes, especially the berets with their red pom-pom. Touching the pom-pom was supposed to be lucky. Sailors can be found in the form of children’s toys on wheels, as bowling pins, or as tops.
Tops are pear-shaped but apart from this they can be executed in a wide variety of finishes and made to spin in a number of different ways. This sailor top is operated by pulling on a string wound around its axis of rotation.

Some tops were not activated by hand but made to spin by whipping them with a flexible cane. Many tops had an iron point at the bottom that helped to make them last longer and that also allowed the top to spin faster. Manufacturers also played with colour because multicoloured tops blur into a single colour as they turn.

Tops are inexpensive toys that are still popular today. Children have always been fascinated by sailors’ exploits and shipwrecks. They "are such stuff as dreams are made on" because by imagining themselves as sailors, children could travel the world. Children also liked French sailors’ costumes, especially the berets with their red pom-pom. Touching the pom-pom was supposed to be lucky. Sailors can be found in the form of children’s toys on wheels, as bowling pins, or as tops.

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

toy

Top in human shape representing a sailor

Musée de la Vie Bourguignonne
Canadian Heritage Information Network
c. 1930
Turned and painted wood
115x60
© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.


Materials:

soft, slightly stretchy fabric for the body and muzzle of the bear (piece 1) a different fabric for the bottom of the paws (pieces 2 and 3) stuffing for the bear two plastic eyes embroidery cotton thread fabric glue a sewing needle and an embroidery needle Assembly

1. First, cut out the pattern pieces:
two of piece 1 (body), adding approximately 5 mm all around two of pieces 2 and 3 (paws) one of piece 4 (muzzle) 2. Attach the eyes as indicated on the pattern to a piece 1.
3. Then, right sides together, sew both pieces 1. Leave an opening between points A and B for turning.
4. Turn the bear right side out.
5. Stuff the bear with padding. Be sure to fill the ears, the ends of the arms and the paws well. Sew the opening between points A and B, turning the seam to the inside.
6. Now place piece 4 as indicated below the eyes. Sew it, turning the seam to t Read More
Materials:

  • soft, slightly stretchy fabric for the body and muzzle of the bear (piece 1)
  • a different fabric for the bottom of the paws (pieces 2 and 3)
  • stuffing for the bear
  • two plastic eyes
  • embroidery cotton
  • thread
  • fabric glue
  • a sewing needle and an embroidery needle
Assembly

1. First, cut out the pattern pieces:
  • two of piece 1 (body), adding approximately 5 mm all around
  • two of pieces 2 and 3 (paws)
  • one of piece 4 (muzzle)
2. Attach the eyes as indicated on the pattern to a piece 1.
3. Then, right sides together, sew both pieces 1. Leave an opening between points A and B for turning.
4. Turn the bear right side out.
5. Stuff the bear with padding. Be sure to fill the ears, the ends of the arms and the paws well. Sew the opening between points A and B, turning the seam to the inside.
6. Now place piece 4 as indicated below the eyes. Sew it, turning the seam to the inside, leaving an opening between points C and D.
7. Stuff the snout so it is rounded and sew the space between points C and D.
8. Now take some embroidery cotton. The colour should be chosen to go with the fabric. Follow the sketch below to embroider the nose, then fill in the nose triangle with close stitches.
9. Finish by embroidering the muzzle like the sketch opposite.
10. Glue or sew a piece 2 to the bottom of each arm and a piece 3 to each of the lower limbs.

Ideas

Instead of embroidering the bear’s nose, you can buy a plastic one or cut one from sturdy cloth and glue it on.

The bear is now finished. You can dress it up by making it a scarf, a sweater, a hat ...

© 1997, CHIN-Canadian Heritage Information Network. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Describe elements of the way of life of children in France;
  • Describe the role of toys in French culture;
  • Describe the history of toys in French culture;
  • Describe the relationship between materials, artistry, and method of manufacture with form and function, using historic French toys as examples;
  • Practise creative skills, manual dexterity, and following instructions.

Teachers' Centre Home Page | Find Learning Resources & Lesson Plans