His wedding

On June 29, 1929, he married Thérèse Ostiguy, second eldest of 10 children born to Noël Ostiguy, a furrier from Salaberry-de-Valleyfield. The honeymoon took place on the Richelieu, a boat where Les Carabins provided musical entertainment.

Another family responsibility

A few months later, Armand Frappier’s father died suddenly at the age of 58. He left behind 4 young children. At age 25, newly married and still a student, Armand took on the responsibility of supporting the family.

His children

In May 1930, one month before he obtained his medical degree from the Université de Montréal, his daughter Lise was born. Armand Frappier had to deliver his daughter himself because the doctor arrived too late. Her birth was later followed by the births of three other children, Monique, Michèle, and Paul.

Lise would go on to pursue medical studies at the Université de Montréal and a Master’s degree in public health at Harvard University in the United States. She became an epidemiologist and professor at McGill University and at the École d’hygiè Read More

His wedding

On June 29, 1929, he married Thérèse Ostiguy, second eldest of 10 children born to Noël Ostiguy, a furrier from Salaberry-de-Valleyfield. The honeymoon took place on the Richelieu, a boat where Les Carabins provided musical entertainment.

Another family responsibility

A few months later, Armand Frappier’s father died suddenly at the age of 58. He left behind 4 young children. At age 25, newly married and still a student, Armand took on the responsibility of supporting the family.

His children

In May 1930, one month before he obtained his medical degree from the Université de Montréal, his daughter Lise was born. Armand Frappier had to deliver his daughter himself because the doctor arrived too late. Her birth was later followed by the births of three other children, Monique, Michèle, and Paul.

Lise would go on to pursue medical studies at the Université de Montréal and a Master’s degree in public health at Harvard University in the United States. She became an epidemiologist and professor at McGill University and at the École d’hygiène de l’Université de Montréal, and worked for more than 30 years at the Institut Armand-Frappier. Lise Frappier married Dr. André Davignon, a professor at the Université de Montréal and a renowned cardiologist at Hôpital Sainte-Justine. Mrs. Frappier-Davignon died in May 1999.

Monique studied in the Faculty of Social Science of the Université de Montréal and earned her Master’s degree in economics. She married Gilles Desrochers and together they adopted two children. She completed her first year of doctoral studies in economics at Cambridge, England, followed by two years at McGill. She held, among others, the position of economic research director in one of the Quebec government ministries.

Michèle obtained her Bachelor of Science in dietetics and nutrition from the Université de Montréal. She worked in a more specialized manner in the field of dairy products in Quebec and then in fisheries in Ottawa. Working for the federal government, she contributed to the commercialization of Canadian fishery products in Canada, the United States, Europe, and in Asia before taking on contracts with the largest governmental and industrial organizations. She married Jacques Daignault, an international financier, and they had two children together.

After college, Paul pursued his studies as a chartered evaluator and became a businessman in building valuation. Paul Frappier and his wife, Diane Berthelet, also a business person, had two children.


© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.

Wedding of Thérèse Ostiguy and Armand Frappier on June 29th, 1929.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


The economy was crumbling. The world was in crisis. Democracies were trembling. Perspectives were daunting. But Armand Frappier did not let this drag him down. He was already used to providing for his own needs and accepted the family responsibilities that destiny forced upon him when his father died while he was still a student. They would not live in wealth, but they would get by.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Lise Frappier with her parents: Thérèse Ostiguy and Armand Frappier.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


The children of Armand Frappier

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Music

From an early age, Armand Frappier was able to have several things on the go at once: juggling his studies and musical interests, all the while making time for friends and leisure. His father introduced him and his brother, Irénée, to the violin, cello, and clarinet. Barely 8 years old, he was already appearing on stage in regional parish halls and social settings, as part of the Frappier trio with his father and his brother. Though he initially played for the sheer pleasure of it, Armand Frappier eventually played the violin to earn money while in school.

In 1924, even though he had no money, Armand Frappier enrolled in the Faculty of Medicine of the Université de Montréal. His father had told him: "I paid for my studies with my music, you’ll do the same." After having unsuccessfully looked for a position as a music teacher, Armand started his own orchestra: "Les Carabins." They played in restaurants, for parties and receptions and, in the summer, on the ships of the Canadian Steamship Line.

Music didn’t make him forget his passion for chemistry. He took a job as an assistant at the chemi Read More

Music

From an early age, Armand Frappier was able to have several things on the go at once: juggling his studies and musical interests, all the while making time for friends and leisure. His father introduced him and his brother, Irénée, to the violin, cello, and clarinet. Barely 8 years old, he was already appearing on stage in regional parish halls and social settings, as part of the Frappier trio with his father and his brother. Though he initially played for the sheer pleasure of it, Armand Frappier eventually played the violin to earn money while in school.

In 1924, even though he had no money, Armand Frappier enrolled in the Faculty of Medicine of the Université de Montréal. His father had told him: "I paid for my studies with my music, you’ll do the same." After having unsuccessfully looked for a position as a music teacher, Armand started his own orchestra: "Les Carabins." They played in restaurants, for parties and receptions and, in the summer, on the ships of the Canadian Steamship Line.

Music didn’t make him forget his passion for chemistry. He took a job as an assistant at the chemistry laboratory of the Université de Montréal and, in addition to that, he took on the responsibility of the chemistry laboratories of Hôpital Saint-Luc and Hôpital Misericorde.

Hunting and fishing

Dr. Frappier spent his leisure time hunting and fishing with his good friends throughout the province of Quebec.

Gardening

He grew plums and cherries in his garden, and made jams for his family. He was an avid reader, and enjoyed playing the violin, listening to music, and relaxing with his family at their home, named la Pointe.

A day in the schedule of the student Frappier…

8 h 00 – Laboratory at Hôpital Saint-Luc
8 h 30 - Courses at the university
12 h 15 – Music at the restaurant at Dupuis et Frères
13 h 30 - Courses at the university
17 h 00 - Laboratory at Hôpital Miséricorde
18 h 30 – Music at Kerhulu et Odiau
1 h 00 - Return home

But where does the student study? Behind the piano, during breaks..


© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.

Dr. Armand Frappier’s violin

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Music was a part of Armand Frappier’s life.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Hunting and fishing

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Dr. Frappier was a real family man, as intensely concerned with his marriage as he was with his children’s lives and those of his other family members and friends. After more than 60 years of marriage, Dr. and Mrs. Frappier were surrounded by their children and their spouses, their 10 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

At the end of his life, he dedicated himself to writing his autobiography, Un rêve, une lutte, from his office in the research institute which today bears his name. On the evening he finished writing, he visited each of his laboratories, to see the researchers, employees, and students. At that time he said: “For the first time in my life, I have no project on my desk.” He died the next day, December 18, 1991, at 87 years of age, in Montreal.

In his memory, the government of Quebec has given his name to one of its prestigious scientific awards, which is given on a yearly basis.

Dr. Frappier was a real family man, as intensely concerned with his marriage as he was with his children’s lives and those of his other family members and friends. After more than 60 years of marriage, Dr. and Mrs. Frappier were surrounded by their children and their spouses, their 10 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

At the end of his life, he dedicated himself to writing his autobiography, Un rêve, une lutte, from his office in the research institute which today bears his name. On the evening he finished writing, he visited each of his laboratories, to see the researchers, employees, and students. At that time he said: “For the first time in my life, I have no project on my desk.” He died the next day, December 18, 1991, at 87 years of age, in Montreal.

In his memory, the government of Quebec has given his name to one of its prestigious scientific awards, which is given on a yearly basis.


© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.

Dr. Armand Frappier and his wife, Thérèse Ostiguy.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • familiarize himself with the vocabulary used in microbiology;
  • explain the relationship between developments in imaging technology and the current understanding of the cell;
  • identify which microorganisms are infectious, how the immune system fights against them, and the reinforcements of modern medicine;
  • describe the benefits of microorganisms.

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