In 1946, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada asked Dr. Frappier to conduct sanitation studies of the First Nations peoples of Quebec and Canada.

The mission given to Dr. Frappier consisted of studying the opportunity and feasibility of vaccinating the nomadic First Nations people against tuberculosis. The first region he visited in 1949 was Waswanipi, north of Senneville. Dr. Frappier visited every tent and vaccinated all the occupants.

Dr. Frappier demonstrated to the authorities the importance of vaccinating indigenous populations, who were being ravaged by tuberculosis. In 1950 and 1952, he went to the Mistassini, Manawan (and Waswanipi) reserves to convince the populations to accept vaccination and to teach the technique to the nurses. BCG vaccination succeeded in eradicating the tuberculosis epidemic in these populations at the time.

In 1946, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada asked Dr. Frappier to conduct sanitation studies of the First Nations peoples of Quebec and Canada.

The mission given to Dr. Frappier consisted of studying the opportunity and feasibility of vaccinating the nomadic First Nations people against tuberculosis. The first region he visited in 1949 was Waswanipi, north of Senneville. Dr. Frappier visited every tent and vaccinated all the occupants.

Dr. Frappier demonstrated to the authorities the importance of vaccinating indigenous populations, who were being ravaged by tuberculosis. In 1950 and 1952, he went to the Mistassini, Manawan (and Waswanipi) reserves to convince the populations to accept vaccination and to teach the technique to the nurses. BCG vaccination succeeded in eradicating the tuberculosis epidemic in these populations at the time.


© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.

Waswanipi vaccination campaign

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Manawan vaccination campaign

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Mistassini vaccination campaign

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


A well-deserved retirement!

Armand Frappier was a welcoming, joyful, and dynamic man, whose tenacity and perseverance allowed him to achieve the goals he set for himself. He was a religious man and he placed the Institut Armand-Frappier under the aegis of St. Joseph. He was a philosopher of lively spirit and sound judgment. Moreover, he always looked at both sides of the coin before giving his opinion. At his conferences, his magnetism was apparent and he excelled in the art of making even the driest subject matter seem interesting. He was a good speaker and could easily make the transition from seriousness to frank light-heartedness. In business matters, he had a good sense of organization and administration. His files were always well prepared. He was also a tireless reader. During his numerous travels, he would take the time to read up on the major and the less major historical aspects of cities and towns. He was considered a patient authority figure to his students, a fair but rather strict examiner. Apparently one day a rather nonchalant student asked him how he could turn around his failures. Dr. Frappier advised him to consult with a surgeon to Read More

A well-deserved retirement!

Armand Frappier was a welcoming, joyful, and dynamic man, whose tenacity and perseverance allowed him to achieve the goals he set for himself. He was a religious man and he placed the Institut Armand-Frappier under the aegis of St. Joseph. He was a philosopher of lively spirit and sound judgment. Moreover, he always looked at both sides of the coin before giving his opinion. At his conferences, his magnetism was apparent and he excelled in the art of making even the driest subject matter seem interesting. He was a good speaker and could easily make the transition from seriousness to frank light-heartedness. In business matters, he had a good sense of organization and administration. His files were always well prepared. He was also a tireless reader. During his numerous travels, he would take the time to read up on the major and the less major historical aspects of cities and towns. He was considered a patient authority figure to his students, a fair but rather strict examiner. Apparently one day a rather nonchalant student asked him how he could turn around his failures. Dr. Frappier advised him to consult with a surgeon to have his right foot rotated 180º so that he could give himself a kick in the pants with every step.

Dr. Frappier retired in 1974, at the age of 70.


© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.

Photograph of Dr. Frappier sitting at his desk at the Institut Armand-Frappier.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


A photograph of Dr. Frappier with bound copies of his writings, a gift from the personnel of the Institut de microbiologie et d'hygiène de Montréal when he retired.

Armand-Frappier Museum

© Armand-Frappier Museum, 2008. All rights reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • familiarize himself with the vocabulary used in microbiology;
  • explain the relationship between developments in imaging technology and the current understanding of the cell;
  • identify which microorganisms are infectious, how the immune system fights against them, and the reinforcements of modern medicine;
  • describe the benefits of microorganisms.

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