"Éducation de la Vierge"

Work by Théophile Hamel (1817-1870)

Photo: Alain Comtois
1845
Oil on canvas
124 X 90 cm
© Maison Saint-Gabriel.


Our first thoughts upon seeing this painting are of a family of another era taking a moment’s rest while walking through the countryside. The parents are taking advantage of the opportunity to educate their daughter. Their eyes reflect great generosity and the hand resting on the girl’s shoulder is a sign of tenderness. But we are suddenly intrigued by the two Angels of Love descending from heaven with a crown of flowers. We then read the title of this work by Théophile Hamel and realize that this is a very special family indeed in the annals of human history and until the end of time.

Donald Alarie
Our first thoughts upon seeing this painting are of a family of another era taking a moment’s rest while walking through the countryside. The parents are taking advantage of the opportunity to educate their daughter. Their eyes reflect great generosity and the hand resting on the girl’s shoulder is a sign of tenderness. But we are suddenly intrigued by the two Angels of Love descending from heaven with a crown of flowers. We then read the title of this work by Théophile Hamel and realize that this is a very special family indeed in the annals of human history and until the end of time.

Donald Alarie

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Théophile Hamel (1817-1870)

Théophile Hamel was born on November 8, 1817 in Sainte-Foy, Quebec, and died in his native city on December 23, 1870. He studied painting under Antoine Plamondon for six years, starting on May 16, 1834. He opened a studio in Quebec City at the start of summer in 1840. In 1843, he travelled to Rome to study. He then spent a year touring Italy. In Paris, he was one of the reproduction painters at the Louvre in the spring of 1846.

After returning to Canada, he opened a studio in Quebec City and taught drawing at the Seminary of Quebec. In 1847, Théophile Hamel settled in Montreal, where he worked in his studio until 1850. Théophile Hamel suffered an eye disease in 1861. The following year, a fire in his studio and exhibition rooms diverted his attention to teaching. He is known as a painter of history and portraits, a reproduction painter and a teacher of fine arts.

In addition to the major political leaders of his day, Théophile Hamel painted historical figures such as Samuel de Champlain, at the government’s request. He often worked for churc Read More
Théophile Hamel (1817-1870)

Théophile Hamel was born on November 8, 1817 in Sainte-Foy, Quebec, and died in his native city on December 23, 1870. He studied painting under Antoine Plamondon for six years, starting on May 16, 1834. He opened a studio in Quebec City at the start of summer in 1840. In 1843, he travelled to Rome to study. He then spent a year touring Italy. In Paris, he was one of the reproduction painters at the Louvre in the spring of 1846.

After returning to Canada, he opened a studio in Quebec City and taught drawing at the Seminary of Quebec. In 1847, Théophile Hamel settled in Montreal, where he worked in his studio until 1850. Théophile Hamel suffered an eye disease in 1861. The following year, a fire in his studio and exhibition rooms diverted his attention to teaching. He is known as a painter of history and portraits, a reproduction painter and a teacher of fine arts.

In addition to the major political leaders of his day, Théophile Hamel painted historical figures such as Samuel de Champlain, at the government’s request. He often worked for churches and religious communities. For the Notre-Dame-de-Bonsecours church in Montreal, he painted an ex-voto: the Sisters of Charity caring for emigrants suffering from typhus in 1847, and this is now considered his masterpiece. The Musée du Québec presented an exhibition of Théophile Hamel’s works in March 1936. A retrospective combining some of his works with those of his master, Plamondon, was presented by the National Gallery of Canada in 1970.

Donald Alarie (1945)

Donald Alarie was born in Montreal in 1945 and has lived in the Joliette area since 1973. Following studies in literature at Université de Montreal, he taught at CÉGEP Joliette-De Lanaudière from 1971 to 1997. He has written a dozen books (novels, novellas, poetry).

Three of his novels (La Rétrospection, La Vie d’hôtel en automne, Comme un lièvre pris au piège) and three collections of novellas (Jérôme et les mots, Un homme paisible, Les figurants) have been published by Éditions Pierre Tisseyre. Since 1987, he has also published four collections of poems in prose, through Écrits des Forges: Petits formats, La Terre comme un dessin inachevé, Parfois même la beauté (copublished with Dé bleu, France) and Ainsi nous allons.

He has also collaborated on one book with Claude R. Blouin, La visiteuse, Le dragon blessé (APLM, 1979) and on another with Bernard Pozier, Au cru du vent (Écrits des Forges/Musée d’art de Joliette, 1990). His writings have been published in many magazines, and many articles have been published on his works. He has won awards in 1978 (Gibson Literary Price), 1980 (Jean-Béraud Molson Prize) and 1987 (Marcel-Panneton Prize), followed by a grant from the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec in 1998.

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

"Saint-Charles Borromée, patron de la Pointe-Saint-Charles"

Work by Pierre LeBer (1669-1707)

Photo: Alain Comtois
1722
Oil on canvas
102 X 84 cm
© Maison Saint-Gabriel.


For this man, it is time for prayer and reverence, communing with the Provider of comfort. As he gradually shuts out the tumult of the world, he feels the glow of peace spread over his face. He has no idea that one day, he will become the patron saint of Pointe-Saint-Charles in Montreal, and will also lend his name to a community in Quebec’s Lanaudière region. Nor does he know that the residents of that community will call themselves Charlois. I know this because I too have been a Charlois for more than 20 years.

Donald Alarie
For this man, it is time for prayer and reverence, communing with the Provider of comfort. As he gradually shuts out the tumult of the world, he feels the glow of peace spread over his face. He has no idea that one day, he will become the patron saint of Pointe-Saint-Charles in Montreal, and will also lend his name to a community in Quebec’s Lanaudière region. Nor does he know that the residents of that community will call themselves Charlois. I know this because I too have been a Charlois for more than 20 years.

Donald Alarie

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Pierre LeBer (1669-1707)

Pierre LeBer was baptized on August 11, 1669, in Montreal. He died on October 1, 1707 at Pointe-Saint-Charles in Montreal. There is no record to indicate whether he was educated in France or Montreal. His arts education was probably inspired by the religious works of art his father owned, as well as the prints that were his father’s stock in trade.

While with the Frères hospitaliers in Montreal, an order he founded in 1692 with François Charon de la Barre, where he had a painting studio, he produced works destined for many churches in New France. In 1697-1698, Pierre LeBer had a chapel built in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, which he had decorated with sculptures produced from his drawings. These works disappeared sometime during the 18th century.

Pierre LeBer painted the posthumous portrait of Marguerite Bourgeoys, who died on January 12, 1700. This is the only work that can definitely be attributed to him. The restoration of this painting in 1963-1964 made it possible to compare his style with that of certain anonymous paintings. As a result, he has been credit Read More
Pierre LeBer (1669-1707)

Pierre LeBer was baptized on August 11, 1669, in Montreal. He died on October 1, 1707 at Pointe-Saint-Charles in Montreal. There is no record to indicate whether he was educated in France or Montreal. His arts education was probably inspired by the religious works of art his father owned, as well as the prints that were his father’s stock in trade.

While with the Frères hospitaliers in Montreal, an order he founded in 1692 with François Charon de la Barre, where he had a painting studio, he produced works destined for many churches in New France. In 1697-1698, Pierre LeBer had a chapel built in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, which he had decorated with sculptures produced from his drawings. These works disappeared sometime during the 18th century.

Pierre LeBer painted the posthumous portrait of Marguerite Bourgeoys, who died on January 12, 1700. This is the only work that can definitely be attributed to him. The restoration of this painting in 1963-1964 made it possible to compare his style with that of certain anonymous paintings. As a result, he has been credited with four oils on canvas, one portrait and three religious paintings, including St-Charles Borromée. There is good reason to assume that there are still other works in existence not known to have been painted by Pierre LeBer.

Donald Alarie (1945)

Donald Alarie was born in Montreal in 1945 and has lived in the Joliette area since 1973. Following studies in literature at Université de Montreal, he taught at CÉGEP Joliette-De Lanaudière from 1971 to 1997. He has written a dozen books (novels, novellas, poetry).

Three of his novels (La Rétrospection, La Vie d’hôtel en automne, Comme un lièvre pris au piège) and three collections of novellas (Jérôme et les mots, Un homme paisible, Les figurants) have been published by Éditions Pierre Tisseyre. Since 1987, he has also published four collections of poems in prose, through Écrits des Forges: Petits formats, La Terre comme un dessin inachevé, Parfois même la beauté (copublished with Dé bleu, France) and Ainsi nous allons.

He has also collaborated on one book with Claude R. Blouin, La visiteuse, Le dragon blessé (APLM,1979) and on another with Bernard Pozier, Au cru du vent (Écrits des Forges/Musée d’art de Joliette, 1990). His writings have been published in many magazines, and many articles have been published on his works. He won awards in 1978 (Gibson Literary Price), 1980 (Jean-Béraud Molson Prize) and 1987 (Marcel-Panneton Prize), followed by a grant from the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec in 1998.

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Understand that art can influence and reflect culture by conveying social and ethical issues
  • Be aware that the creative process is influenced by personal experience.
  • Understand that our reaction to art is based on our own experiences
  • Understand relationships between visual communication and written expression
  • Be aware that writers and artists use a range of strategies to communicate meaning
  • Be aware of the diversity of Francophone art across Canada
  • Develop an appreciation of historical and contemporary Francophone art in Canada
  • Recognize the role of the curator in choosing, researching and interpreting art for exhibition

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