"Un paysage dans le paysage - Le paysage comme tableau vivant"

Work by Francine Larivée

Photo: Ivan Binet
1993-1996
Moss (bryophyte), sphagnum moss, extruded polystyrene and stainless steel
Prof: 162 x 457 cm (wide)
© Musée régional de Rimouski.


If we don’t heed the passage of water under the bridge, we may not see the huge mossy back of the quaternary giant rising from the centre of the earth to warm his ancient body in the sun.

Care has been taken to trace trajectories through the foliage with rays of light, invisible lines of convergence that unit in birth of the work. Because we see it so clearly, when we stop, it does not appear to be stones that support the moss, but the wrinkles of a brain, the unfurling of new thought in the landscape. The river must have its due, the tenderest green of summer. And because under the high water the extruded polystyrene weighs little more than an idea, the landscape must be returned to the shelter of men until the next cycle starts.

Jacqueline Chénard
If we don’t heed the passage of water under the bridge, we may not see the huge mossy back of the quaternary giant rising from the centre of the earth to warm his ancient body in the sun.

Care has been taken to trace trajectories through the foliage with rays of light, invisible lines of convergence that unit in birth of the work. Because we see it so clearly, when we stop, it does not appear to be stones that support the moss, but the wrinkles of a brain, the unfurling of new thought in the landscape. The river must have its due, the tenderest green of summer. And because under the high water the extruded polystyrene weighs little more than an idea, the landscape must be returned to the shelter of men until the next cycle starts.

Jacqueline Chénard

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Francine Larivée

Francine Larivée was born in Montreal, where she now lives and works. Her works have been exhibited in several individual shows, including those at the Musée régional de Rimouski (1994), Centre d’exposition Circa, Montreal (1991), Centre Expression, Saint-Hyacinthe (1990) at Galerie Aubes 3935, Montreal (1989 and 1986), the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (1982) and the Quebec Pavilion at Man and His World in Montreal (1977). She has participated in numerous group exhibitions in Quebec, Canada and France. She has produced public works of art on several occasions. Her works are found in private collections in Canada and the United States and in such public collections as the Canada Art Bank, the National Bank, the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (Lavalin collection), Musée du Québec (art lending collection) and Musée régional de Rimouski.

Jacqueline Chénard

Jaqueline Chénard had an inclination toward painting in a previous life. S Read More
Francine Larivée

Francine Larivée was born in Montreal, where she now lives and works. Her works have been exhibited in several individual shows, including those at the Musée régional de Rimouski (1994), Centre d’exposition Circa, Montreal (1991), Centre Expression, Saint-Hyacinthe (1990) at Galerie Aubes 3935, Montreal (1989 and 1986), the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (1982) and the Quebec Pavilion at Man and His World in Montreal (1977). She has participated in numerous group exhibitions in Quebec, Canada and France. She has produced public works of art on several occasions. Her works are found in private collections in Canada and the United States and in such public collections as the Canada Art Bank, the National Bank, the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (Lavalin collection), Musée du Québec (art lending collection) and Musée régional de Rimouski.

Jacqueline Chénard

Jaqueline Chénard had an inclination toward painting in a previous life. She experimented with all the materials and found that bringing her garden, her neat fields, her scarecrows on clotheslines into the museum posed serious logistical problems. She has leanings toward biology and continues to work on five living creations, 25, 24, 22, 19 and 5 years old. She is completing a masters in literature and writes poetry, fragments, aphorisms, short stories and articles on literary criticism.

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

"Les regards d'encre II"

Work by Jocelyne Alloucherie

Photo: Michel Laverdière
1995
Mixed media
240 x 240 x 10 cm
© Musée régional de Rimouski.


Gazes of Ink

Night has descended over the earth, arises from the earth, is the earth. The sky, as clear as the page, is blind. And the landscape, circled - with ink. Everything appears to be reversed. Everything becomes fixed.

On a bank of shadow, dark greenery. Grass on the slope. Nothing rests there any more, neither body or eye.

Grass standing upright, in the centre of a great U. Three times crimped, with a halo as well:
grey mist perhaps only imagined.

We are in a garden. No shelter. Our silhouette, on the edge,
invisible for the time, strikes too bold a contrast.

Grass is like the little cloud raised by the bullet that could
whistle to our ear..

Robert Dion
Gazes of Ink

Night has descended over the earth, arises from the earth, is the earth. The sky, as clear as the page, is blind. And the landscape, circled - with ink. Everything appears to be reversed. Everything becomes fixed.

On a bank of shadow, dark greenery. Grass on the slope. Nothing rests there any more, neither body or eye.

Grass standing upright, in the centre of a great U. Three times crimped, with a halo as well:
grey mist perhaps only imagined.

We are in a garden. No shelter. Our silhouette, on the edge,
invisible for the time, strikes too bold a contrast.

Grass is like the little cloud raised by the bullet that could
whistle to our ear..

Robert Dion

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Jocelyne Alloucherie

Jocelyne Alloucherie lives and works in Montreal. She teaches visual arts at Université Laval in Quebec City. Her works have been shown at many individual exhibitions in Quebec, Canada, France, Italy and the United States, including Paysages généraux at the London Regional Art and Historical Museums (1998), Galerie Samuel Lallouz, Montréal (1997), Paysages généraux at the Owens Art Gallery, Sackville, N.B. and the Dalhousie Art Gallery, Halifax, N.S. (1997), Paysages généraux, Musée régional de Rimouski (1995), Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (1995), the CIAC, Montreal (1992) and Galerie Chantal Boulanger, Montreal (1989). She has participated in numerous group exhibitions in Canada, France, England and Spain. Jocelyne’s work is listed in several exhibition catalogues and has been reviewed in Parachute, C Magazine, Flash Art, Vie des Arts and Espace. Her works are included in many public co Read More
Jocelyne Alloucherie

Jocelyne Alloucherie lives and works in Montreal. She teaches visual arts at Université Laval in Quebec City. Her works have been shown at many individual exhibitions in Quebec, Canada, France, Italy and the United States, including Paysages généraux at the London Regional Art and Historical Museums (1998), Galerie Samuel Lallouz, Montréal (1997), Paysages généraux at the Owens Art Gallery, Sackville, N.B. and the Dalhousie Art Gallery, Halifax, N.S. (1997), Paysages généraux, Musée régional de Rimouski (1995), Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (1995), the CIAC, Montreal (1992) and Galerie Chantal Boulanger, Montreal (1989). She has participated in numerous group exhibitions in Canada, France, England and Spain. Jocelyne’s work is listed in several exhibition catalogues and has been reviewed in Parachute, C Magazine, Flash Art, Vie des Arts and Espace. Her works are included in many public collections in Canada.

Robert Dion

Professor of French and Quebec literature at Université du Québec à Rimouski and member pf the Centre de recherche en littérature québécoise (CRELIQ) at Université Laval, Robert Dion is continuing research on literary criticism, theory and narrative. He has published two books of criticism, Le structuralisme littéraire en France (Éditions Balzac, 1993) and Le moment critique de la fiction (Nuit blanche éditeur, 1997). He also writes and has taken part in many artistic events; in 1993, he published a signature-bound book entitled Le droit du sol (Nuit blanche éditeur).

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

"Sans titre, dyptique # 5 de la série Intérieur/Jour"

Work by Claude-Philippe Benoit (1953)

Photographer : Claude-Phillippe Benoit
1991
Photography on paper
214 x 79 cm
© Confederation Centre Art Gallery and Museum .


Uneven Paragraphs About Ancient Things

"People, people, people, people."*
*Paul Erhlich, The Population Bomb, 1968.

Speak with the artist before writing this text, be trusting. Listen to the artist say how he wishes to leave to the onlooker the task of deciphering the images, how he prefers to step back, how in fact, he has tried to be impertinent while laying his images side by side instead of opting for the over-coded, the over-sustained message. Listen to him again as he claims his freedom as an artist with the right (and the responsibility) of finding effects without having to measure them. Acknowledge that he is right, since, somewhere, some degree of freedom has to be experienced. Then look again at those images with their dark tones, look again at the tall trees and the industrial interiors, and feel anew the fear that humanity will no doubt and very soon-- within a few decades-- experience a catastrophe that it will have brought upon itself. Choose not to describe the work, avoid taking refuge in a "formal analysis" as have done some critics who, when commenting upon these images, have n Read More
Uneven Paragraphs About Ancient Things

"People, people, people, people."*
*Paul Erhlich, The Population Bomb, 1968.

Speak with the artist before writing this text, be trusting. Listen to the artist say how he wishes to leave to the onlooker the task of deciphering the images, how he prefers to step back, how in fact, he has tried to be impertinent while laying his images side by side instead of opting for the over-coded, the over-sustained message. Listen to him again as he claims his freedom as an artist with the right (and the responsibility) of finding effects without having to measure them. Acknowledge that he is right, since, somewhere, some degree of freedom has to be experienced. Then look again at those images with their dark tones, look again at the tall trees and the industrial interiors, and feel anew the fear that humanity will no doubt and very soon-- within a few decades-- experience a catastrophe that it will have brought upon itself. Choose not to describe the work, avoid taking refuge in a "formal analysis" as have done some critics who, when commenting upon these images, have noted "structural" links between the composition of the images of the forest and those of the interior images. Rather, as the artist did, decide to create a feeling for something, something related to very ancient matter and our strange, and almost as old, agitation around it.

Serge Bérard

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Claude-Philippe Benoit (1953)

Born in 1953, lives and works in Montreal

Education

1975 Algonquin College, Ottawa
Diploma in Visual Arts, Cinematography

Photographer

Represented By

Brenda Wallace Gallery, Montreal, Quebec.

Collections

Pinakotek Museum (Bayrische Staatsgemäldesammlungen), Munich
Musée du Québec, Quebec
Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography, Ottawa
Canada Council for the Arts, Art Bank, Ottawa
Visual Arts Program/City of Ottawa, Ottawa
Bibliothèque centrale de prêt de l’Outaouais, Hull
National Archives of Canada, Ottawa
Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto
Winnipeg Art Gallery, Winnipeg
Confederation Centre Art Gallery and Museum, Charlottetown

Private collections in Canada and abroad

Grants
1986-87 Canada Council for the Arts
1987-88 Ministère des Affaires culturelles du Québec
Claude-Philippe Benoit (1953)

Born in 1953, lives and works in Montreal

Education

1975 Algonquin College, Ottawa
Diploma in Visual Arts, Cinematography

Photographer

Represented By

Brenda Wallace Gallery, Montreal, Quebec.

Collections

Pinakotek Museum (Bayrische Staatsgemäldesammlungen), Munich
Musée du Québec, Quebec
Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography, Ottawa
Canada Council for the Arts, Art Bank, Ottawa
Visual Arts Program/City of Ottawa, Ottawa
Bibliothèque centrale de prêt de l’Outaouais, Hull
National Archives of Canada, Ottawa
Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto
Winnipeg Art Gallery, Winnipeg
Confederation Centre Art Gallery and Museum, Charlottetown

Private collections in Canada and abroad

Grants
1986-87 Canada Council for the Arts
1987-88 Ministère des Affaires culturelles du Québec

© 1997, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:

  • Understand that art can influence and reflect culture by conveying social and ethical issues
  • Be aware that the creative process is influenced by personal experience.
  • Understand that our reaction to art is based on our own experiences
  • Understand relationships between visual communication and written expression
  • Be aware that writers and artists use a range of strategies to communicate meaning
  • Be aware of the diversity of Francophone art across Canada
  • Develop an appreciation of historical and contemporary Francophone art in Canada
  • Recognize the role of the curator in choosing, researching and interpreting art for exhibition

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