Ontario’s Science North is mounting a virtual exhibition on mining exploration in Canada. This exhibit explains that Voisey Bay, Labrador, has a major deposit of nickel, copper and cobalt. Nickel is used mainly in making alloys with other metals.

Which of the following is one of the characteristics of nickel?
Highly resistant to a wide range of temperatures Excellent conductor of electricity Element associated with cancer treatment
Ontario’s Science North is mounting a virtual exhibition on mining exploration in Canada. This exhibit explains that Voisey Bay, Labrador, has a major deposit of nickel, copper and cobalt. Nickel is used mainly in making alloys with other metals.

Which of the following is one of the characteristics of nickel?
  1. Highly resistant to a wide range of temperatures
  2. Excellent conductor of electricity
  3. Element associated with cancer treatment

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Nickel has become increasingly important to our modern society. The most common use is in alloys, in which nickel is combined with other metals to form a substance with desirable characteristics, such as resistance to corrosion and great strength over a wide range of temperatures. Well over half of the nickel we consume is in stainless steel, an alloy of nickel, chromium and iron. You use products made of stainless steel every day: cutlery, pots and pans, appliances, batteries, and even the kitchen sink! Other nickel-based alloys are used in a variety of industries, including the aerospace, oil and gas, chemical, nuclear and food industries

Copper is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity, resists corrosion, and is easy to shape into thin wires and sheets. It is used in a broad range of alloys, but the most common use is in electrical components, wires and cables.The rocks at Voisey’s Bay may hold two million tonnes of nickel and one million tonnes of copper. That’s a lot of stainless steel flatware and electrical wiring!
Nickel has become increasingly important to our modern society. The most common use is in alloys, in which nickel is combined with other metals to form a substance with desirable characteristics, such as resistance to corrosion and great strength over a wide range of temperatures. Well over half of the nickel we consume is in stainless steel, an alloy of nickel, chromium and iron. You use products made of stainless steel every day: cutlery, pots and pans, appliances, batteries, and even the kitchen sink! Other nickel-based alloys are used in a variety of industries, including the aerospace, oil and gas, chemical, nuclear and food industries

Copper is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity, resists corrosion, and is easy to shape into thin wires and sheets. It is used in a broad range of alloys, but the most common use is in electrical components, wires and cables.The rocks at Voisey’s Bay may hold two million tonnes of nickel and one million tonnes of copper. That’s a lot of stainless steel flatware and electrical wiring!

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

One of the characteristics of nickel is:

1. Highly resistant to a wide range of temperatures
2. Excellent conductor of electricity
3. Element associated with cancer treatment
One of the characteristics of nickel is:

1. Highly resistant to a wide range of temperatures
2. Excellent conductor of electricity
3. Element associated with cancer treatment

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

In the late nineteenth century, William "St. Thomas" Smith was one of Canada’s first impressionist painters. He produced some remarkable landscapes and seascapes. London’s Regional Art and Historical Museums has several of his paintings on display.

What special technique did William "St. Thomas" Smith use to create effects in his landscapes?
In the late nineteenth century, William "St. Thomas" Smith was one of Canada’s first impressionist painters. He produced some remarkable landscapes and seascapes. London’s Regional Art and Historical Museums has several of his paintings on display.

What special technique did William "St. Thomas" Smith use to create effects in his landscapes?

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

“House by the River” by William "St. Thomas" Smith

William "St. Thomas" Smith
London Regional Art and Historical Museums, gif from Mrs. Fred Phelps, London

Watercolour on paper
35.6 cm x 50.8 cm
© London Regional Art and Historical Museums


William "St. Thomas" Smith (1862-1947) was born in Belfast, Ireland and died at St. Thomas, Ontario. His family emigrated to Canada when he was a child and settled at Beaverton, Ontario. He received his art training at the Ontario College of Art and reputedly it was there he received the nickname of "St. Thomas" to differentiate him from another art student also named "William Smith". Later he worked in the studio of J. W. L. Forster and formed a close friendship with Curtis Williamson. Their choice of Barbizon subjects influenced his early paintings. After marrying a local artist and teacher, Smith settled permanently in St. Thomas, Ontario and by 1887, was part of the art staff at Alma College. He traveled widely in Canada, Great Britain and Europe during his long career. Most of his work was in the medium of watercolour usually choosing landscape and seascapes as subjects. St. Thomas Smith was one of the early impressionistic painters and specialized in using a watercolour wet paper technique to achieve atmospheric effects. His art was exhibited at the Ontario Society of Artists, the Royal Canadian Academy, the Toronto Industrial Exhibition and man Read More
William "St. Thomas" Smith (1862-1947) was born in Belfast, Ireland and died at St. Thomas, Ontario. His family emigrated to Canada when he was a child and settled at Beaverton, Ontario. He received his art training at the Ontario College of Art and reputedly it was there he received the nickname of "St. Thomas" to differentiate him from another art student also named "William Smith". Later he worked in the studio of J. W. L. Forster and formed a close friendship with Curtis Williamson. Their choice of Barbizon subjects influenced his early paintings. After marrying a local artist and teacher, Smith settled permanently in St. Thomas, Ontario and by 1887, was part of the art staff at Alma College. He traveled widely in Canada, Great Britain and Europe during his long career. Most of his work was in the medium of watercolour usually choosing landscape and seascapes as subjects. St. Thomas Smith was one of the early impressionistic painters and specialized in using a watercolour wet paper technique to achieve atmospheric effects. His art was exhibited at the Ontario Society of Artists, the Royal Canadian Academy, the Toronto Industrial Exhibition and many commercial galleries. Smith’s career was highlighted by an honorary degree from the University of Western Ontario in 1940 and a retrospective by our institution in 1947.

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

The special technique William "St. Thomas" Smith used to create effects in his landscapes was:

1. Watercolour wet paper
2. Engraving
3. Red chalk
The special technique William "St. Thomas" Smith used to create effects in his landscapes was:

1. Watercolour wet paper
2. Engraving
3. Red chalk

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Science North
One of the characteristics of nickel is:
1. Highly resistant to a wide range of temperatures

London’s Regional Art and Historical Museums
The special technique William "St. Thomas" Smith used to create effects in his landscapes was:
1. Watercolour wet paper
Science North
One of the characteristics of nickel is:
1. Highly resistant to a wide range of temperatures

London’s Regional Art and Historical Museums
The special technique William "St. Thomas" Smith used to create effects in his landscapes was:
1. Watercolour wet paper

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Relate intriguing facts about Canada
  • Increase their interest in Canadian history and culture
  • Gain an appreciation for the variety of museums in Canada

Teachers' Centre Home Page | Find Learning Resources & Lesson Plans