Troodon, or "wounding tooth," was known only from its teeth for almost 100 years. The shape and size of the teeth clearly suggested that Troodon was a meat-eater. In the early 1980s we began to understand more about the rest of the animal when a lower jaw and skull were found near the Royal Tyrrell Museum. The discovery of this specimen provided proof that Troodon may have been the smartest dinosaur ever, boasting a brain that was proportionally larger than any other dinosaur. Troodon’s high level of intelligence and it’s deadly sickle claw make it one of the most important fossil finds of the last twenty years.
Troodon, or "wounding tooth," was known only from its teeth for almost 100 years. The shape and size of the teeth clearly suggested that Troodon was a meat-eater. In the early 1980s we began to understand more about the rest of the animal when a lower jaw and skull were found near the Royal Tyrrell Museum. The discovery of this specimen provided proof that Troodon may have been the smartest dinosaur ever, boasting a brain that was proportionally larger than any other dinosaur. Troodon’s high level of intelligence and it’s deadly sickle claw make it one of the most important fossil finds of the last twenty years.

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Troodon

One of the smartest dinosaurs, based on the size of the braincase.

Royal Tyrrell Museum

© Royal Tyrrell Museum


At more than five metres tall and 10 metres long, Albertosaurus was among the largest land-dwelling carnivores to have ever lived. Like its cousin, Tyrannosaurus, it had small forearms, each with two claws. Its hind limbs were large and powerful. With dagger-like teeth and powerful jaws, it could rip flesh from its prey and swallow the pieces whole. Albertosaurus has been unearthed from Upper Cretaceous deposits throughout western North America. Several well-preserved specimens of Albertosaurus have been collected in Alberta. One of the first discoveries of Albertosaurus was in 1884 when Joseph B. Tyrrell, made a find just a few kilometres away from the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology.
At more than five metres tall and 10 metres long, Albertosaurus was among the largest land-dwelling carnivores to have ever lived. Like its cousin, Tyrannosaurus, it had small forearms, each with two claws. Its hind limbs were large and powerful. With dagger-like teeth and powerful jaws, it could rip flesh from its prey and swallow the pieces whole. Albertosaurus has been unearthed from Upper Cretaceous deposits throughout western North America. Several well-preserved specimens of Albertosaurus have been collected in Alberta. One of the first discoveries of Albertosaurus was in 1884 when Joseph B. Tyrrell, made a find just a few kilometres away from the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology.

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Albertosaurus

Fleshed out meat-eating dinosaur, Albertosaurus.

Royal Tyrrell Museum

© Royal Tyrrell Museum


Tyrannosaurus rex, the Terrible Lizard King lived at the very end of the Cretaceous, 65-66 million years ago. A full-grown T.rex would have measured up to 13 metres long from the nose to the end of its tail. A ferocious meat-eater at the top of the food chain, T.rex would have preyed on any other land-dwelling animals. T.rex is one of the most popular dinosaurs ever discovered, despite recent challenges to its prominence by the giant carnivorous dinosaurs such as Giganotosaurus who may have been as large, but whose jaws and teeth would have been less powerful.
Tyrannosaurus rex, the Terrible Lizard King lived at the very end of the Cretaceous, 65-66 million years ago. A full-grown T.rex would have measured up to 13 metres long from the nose to the end of its tail. A ferocious meat-eater at the top of the food chain, T.rex would have preyed on any other land-dwelling animals. T.rex is one of the most popular dinosaurs ever discovered, despite recent challenges to its prominence by the giant carnivorous dinosaurs such as Giganotosaurus who may have been as large, but whose jaws and teeth would have been less powerful.

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Tyrannosaurus rex

This king of the dinosaurs was up to 15 metres long and had teeth that were perfect for crushing bones.

Royal Tyrrell Museum

© Royal Tyrrell Museum


Dromaeosaurus may have been a small Cretaceous predator, but it was a fast runner and efficient killer. Dromaeosaurus had a relatively large brain. On each of its hind was a sickle-shaped slashing claw, a weapon that would have been used to gut prey. Dromaeosaurs, such as Velociraptor, became very popular dinosaurs with the release of the movie Jurassic Park.
Dromaeosaurus may have been a small Cretaceous predator, but it was a fast runner and efficient killer. Dromaeosaurus had a relatively large brain. On each of its hind was a sickle-shaped slashing claw, a weapon that would have been used to gut prey. Dromaeosaurs, such as Velociraptor, became very popular dinosaurs with the release of the movie Jurassic Park.

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Dromaeosaurus

This dinosaur stalked its prey in packs.

Royal Tyrrell Museum

© Royal Tyrrell Museum


Struthiomimus (STROO-thee-oh-MYE-mus), or "ostrich mimic" is a slim, long-legged dinosaur best known from the Cretaceous deposits of Alberta. It grew up to four meters in length, half of which was tail. The animal's thin-boned skull lacks teeth, which suggests Struthiomimus relied on speed to avoid predators such as Albertosaurus and T. rex. Struthiomimus may have eaten small animals, insects, and plants. Bird-mimic dinosaurs such as Struthiomimus were probably the fastest dinosaurs, possibly reaching speeds of up to 60 km/h.
Struthiomimus (STROO-thee-oh-MYE-mus), or "ostrich mimic" is a slim, long-legged dinosaur best known from the Cretaceous deposits of Alberta. It grew up to four meters in length, half of which was tail. The animal's thin-boned skull lacks teeth, which suggests Struthiomimus relied on speed to avoid predators such as Albertosaurus and T. rex. Struthiomimus may have eaten small animals, insects, and plants. Bird-mimic dinosaurs such as Struthiomimus were probably the fastest dinosaurs, possibly reaching speeds of up to 60 km/h.

© 2001, CHIN. All Rights Reserved.

Struthiomimus

This is a reconstruction of one of the fastest dinosaurs to ever walk the earth.

Royal Tyrrell Museum

© Royal Tyrrell Museum


Learning Objectives

The learner will:
  • Develop enthusiasm and continuing interest in the study of science
  • Describe some Cretaceous meat-eating dinosaurs and their ecology

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