Bell Shoes

The bell symbol on the sole indicates that this pair of walking shoes was made in the J. & T. Bell factory at Montreal. A label is not necessary to recognise a machine-made shoe: tiny regular stitches reveal its manufacture by machine rather than by a craftsman.

The Bell advertisement proudly proclaim the shoe factory’s size and modernity.

Bell’s was just one of hundreds of shoe factories in Quebec and Ontario at the end of the nineteenth century.

Children's Shoes

In the early years, some parents could not afford any shoes for their children: ‘The children, during bad times had been forced to dispense with these necessary coverings. How often during the winter season I wept over their little chapped feet, literally washing them with my tears.’ Susanna Moodie

While infants wore tiny shoes, similar to what they wear today, older children wore miniature versions of contemporary adult shoes. These reflected the changing footwear styles of the time, as many parents took pride i Read More
Bell Shoes

The bell symbol on the sole indicates that this pair of walking shoes was made in the J. & T. Bell factory at Montreal. A label is not necessary to recognise a machine-made shoe: tiny regular stitches reveal its manufacture by machine rather than by a craftsman.

The Bell advertisement proudly proclaim the shoe factory’s size and modernity.

Bell’s was just one of hundreds of shoe factories in Quebec and Ontario at the end of the nineteenth century.

Children's Shoes

In the early years, some parents could not afford any shoes for their children: ‘The children, during bad times had been forced to dispense with these necessary coverings. How often during the winter season I wept over their little chapped feet, literally washing them with my tears.’ Susanna Moodie

While infants wore tiny shoes, similar to what they wear today, older children wore miniature versions of contemporary adult shoes. These reflected the changing footwear styles of the time, as many parents took pride in dressing their children in fashionable shoes.

© The Bata Shoe Museum, 2005. All Rights Reserved.

Bell shoe advertisement, 1890

Bell shoe advertisement, 1890

The Bata Shoe Museum

© The Bata Shoe Museum, 2005. All Rights Reserved.


Bell Shoes

The bell symbol on the sole indicates that this pair of walking shoes was made in the J. & T. Bell factory at Montreal. A label is not necessary to recognise a machine-made shoe: tiny regular stitches reveal its manufacture by machine rather than by a craftsman.

J. & T. Bell
c. 1890
Black kid and glass beads
968.062.9
© Joseph Brant Museum


Susanna Moodie

Susanna Moodie

LAC/C-007043.

© LAC/C-007043.


Woolsey Family Portrait, 1809

Woolsey Family Portrait, 1809

William Berczy
1809
© NGC 5675


Portrait of Two Boys

Portrait of Two Boys

Toronto Public Library

© TRL, Picture Collection


Miss. H. Frothingham on a porch, 1871

Miss. H. Frothingham on a porch, 1871

William Notman

© McCord Museum


Child's Boot

Child's Boot

The Bata Shoe Museum

Leather
P86.149
© The Bata Shoe Museum, 2005. All Rights Reserved.


Infant's Lace Boots

While infants wore tiny shoes, similar to what they wear today, older children wore miniature versions of contemporary adult shoes. These reflected the changing footwear styles of the time, as many parents took pride in dressing their children in fashionable shoes.

The Bata Shoe Museum
1880 - 1900
Kid and leather
S81.175
© The Bata Shoe Museum, 2005. All Rights Reserved.


Child's Button Boots

Child's Button Boots

The Bata Shoe Museum
Start of XXth Century
Leather
S81.68
© The Bata Shoe Museum, 2005. All Rights Reserved.


Child's Boot

Child's Boot

The Bata Shoe Museum

Leather and textile
S86.202
© The Bata Shoe Museum, 2005. All Rights Reserved.


Girl's Boots

Girl's Boots

J.D. King & Co.

Leather
P86.256
© The Bata Shoe Museum, 2005. All Rights Reserved.


Child's Lace Boots

Child's Lace Boots

The Bata Shoe Museum
1900
Leather
S80.1683
© The Bata Shoe Museum, 2005. All Rights Reserved.


Learning Objectives

The learner will :
  • Explain how the environment influenced population (Aboriginal, French and Engilsh) in their culture, lifestyle and economy;
  • Identify the effects that resulted from interaction between Aboriginal peoples and colonizers;
  • Summarize the evolution of the shoes in Canada and involve significant changes to Canada’s development;
  • Analyze the development of Canada through the evolution of shoes.

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